Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: Resource for periodization of women's hurdles

  1. #1

    Resource for periodization of women's hurdles

    Can anyone here recommend a good resource that provides a solid background of information involving conditioning for women's hurdles and periodization of this event?

    I have just started working with a high school female hurdler who wants to peak when indoor season begins in November.

    thanks!

  2. #2
    tc0710
    Guest
    In terms of planning in general the Van'04 DVD is very good. However, I too want more information on periodisation for the hurdles as I am unsure how the rhythm element can be varied to achieve a peak.

  3. #3
    In general, sticking with the short to long approach, I'd suggest working hurdles early in the year with a higher volume, lower height and closer spacing. The higher volume provides conditioning, while the lower height and tighter spacing allows a slightly lower speed to allow the higher volume but all while maintaining a racing rhythm. You want to target a spacing that is at or faster than the splits used in racing. Probably pulling in each hurdle about 2 to 3 feet for starters. Keep the number of hurdles covered per rep in the 3 to 5 area.

    As you progress toward the season, reduce volume, increase height and spacing, but only rarely do race height and spacing, always making sure that the rhythm (split times) are at the racing target time. You also can add more hurdles to a rep (5 to 8) as you decrease the total volume by reducing the number of reps.

    As you move to peaking, I'd back off on volume and number of hurdles per rep, just as you would in sprint periodization.

  4. #4
    tc0710
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by speedz
    only rarely do race height and spacing
    Why? Surely you need to be used to get your body tuned to clearing hurdles at full height. I can understand this more for men's hurdles than womens though. Any thoughts?

  5. #5
    Clemson
    Guest
    TAF News "The Hurdles" from trackandfieldnews.com is a great start.

    Are you doing the lifting and energy system development? What are your roles...how many days a week?

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    1,801
    Quote Originally Posted by tc0710
    Why? Surely you need to be used to get your body tuned to clearing hurdles at full height. I can understand this more for men's hurdles than womens though. Any thoughts?
    I agree with speedz. Go up to regulation spacing and heights very rarely if at all-even for the women though it's probably not quite as crucial. When they get into races, adrenaline and increased focus(after an effective training program of course) will easily be able to get them over the hurdles with proficiency.

    It often takes some convincing of the athlete to train at reduced spacings and heights but it's worth the effort of setting up such guidelines. Most of the world class programs that I've viewed on paper or in talking with their coaches, train in this manner.

  7. #7
    Note that I said rarely at regular height and spacing. I think regular height at reduced spacing is fine. Or if you have a good tailwind, go for the regular height and spacing a few times over a few hurdles late in the season.

    The reason you don't want to do that regular height and spacing work is that you end up practicing a tempo/rhythm slower than what you want to develop for racing. You always want to maintain race cadence or faster in doing speed work over hurdles.

    For just getting used to height of hurdles, for less experienced athletes, you don't need to have prescribed spacings or work at high speed. Just set them so the athletes can work at a fast but controlled speed without having to overstride to achieve their stride pattern, which could be a three or five step rhythm. Or even four if you are working on alternating for beginners.

  8. #8
    Clemson
    Guest
    I think Carolinaadi is a strength coach so perhaps we could get into energy system and strength needs?

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Clemson
    TAF News "The Hurdles" from trackandfieldnews.com is a great start.

    Are you doing the lifting and energy system development? What are your roles...how many days a week?
    In addition to what Clemson suggested you may want to locate books or articles by Brent McFarlane. I feel his work is very ideal for developing hurdlers.

    Everything that has been said regarding race modeling and hurdle rhythm is correct. In addition, don't overlook the value of general fitness and/or strength endurance for hurdlers (young and old). I have found some coaches force hurdling on kids before they are strong/fit enough to achieve the desired positions. So spend equal or more time getting them fit and strong.

    Hope that helps....

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    1,801
    Quote Originally Posted by tc0710
    Why? Surely you need to be used to get your body tuned to clearing hurdles at full height. I can understand this more for men's hurdles than womens though. Any thoughts?
    Another reason to avoid full height and spacing for hurdles is being able to repeat speeds in training to elicit a positive training response. You want to be able to repeat efforts within a training session that will be race pace or faster. Besides keeping training distances below race distances, you can also achieve similar effects via the reductions mentioned. Difficult to maintain same quality for more than a couple of reps or so due to problems that come about from the effort required to clear hurdles under normal conditions.

Similar Threads

  1. Welcome to No Excuses
    By Rupert in forum Tempo Discussions
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 09-02-2009, 12:54 PM
  2. Split: building and sprinting
    By NFS in forum Recovery and Regeneration
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-13-2009, 09:04 AM
  3. All Beijing Olympic 4x400 splits
    By kitkat1 in forum Beijing 2008 Coverage
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02-19-2009, 06:56 AM
  4. Steps in 400 hurdles
    By JayRee208 in forum Advanced Sprint Training
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-21-2003, 02:46 PM
  5. Press ups.
    By maris in forum Strength Training
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 02-28-2003, 04:43 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •