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Thread: When and if to stop weights

  1. #1

    When and if to stop weights

    Hi, I have a client who's 15 and is trying out for the team BC under17 hockey team.

    I was wondering what you guys thought on this topic.

    My client isn't working out with weights for a week before he leaves. I was hoping he'd get in and stop weights 3 days before he traveled.

    He's doing an upper and lower split routine.

    Have you guys heard of anything on the topic?

  2. #2
    Moderator xlr8's Avatar
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    I don't expect that he will gain much or lose much by missing a week. However, I think the danger is lack of CNS stimulation. I believe that Charlie would have athletes do heavy benching up to 3 days before competition to make sure the CNS is sharp.

    I also think that higher calibre athletes hold the CNS stimulation longer than lower calibre athletes. Therefore, a younger athlete could and probably should lift for CNS stimulation even closer to competition.

  3. #3
    tc0710
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    Quote Originally Posted by xlr8
    I don't expect that he will gain much or lose much by missing a week. However, I think the danger is lack of CNS stimulation. I believe that Charlie would have athletes do heavy benching up to 3 days before competition to make sure the CNS is sharp.

    I also think that higher calibre athletes hold the CNS stimulation longer than lower calibre athletes. Therefore, a younger athlete could and probably should lift for CNS stimulation even closer to competition.
    How do you strike the balance between CNS stimulation and fatigue? I assume you are talking about very low volumes of bench maybe 2 sets of 2? I also assume you do bench instead of squats to avoid fatigue? Am I on the right track?

    Cheers,

    TC

  4. #4
    Moderator xlr8's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tc0710
    How do you strike the balance between CNS stimulation and fatigue? I assume you are talking about very low volumes of bench maybe 2 sets of 2? I also assume you do bench instead of squats to avoid fatigue? Am I on the right track?
    Right on! Part of striking this balance will be simply working with the athlete to see how much is enough but not too much.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by tc0710
    How do you strike the balance between CNS stimulation and fatigue? I assume you are talking about very low volumes of bench maybe 2 sets of 2? I also assume you do bench instead of squats to avoid fatigue? Am I on the right track?

    Cheers,

    TC
    The kid is only 15 so I don't do any lower than 8 reps. He's been working out for 2.5 years with weights now.

    That was also the exact reason I wanted him to get in a few more days. CNS drop off.

  6. #6
    tc0710
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    Quote Originally Posted by xlr8
    Right on! Part of striking this balance will be simply working with the athlete to see how much is enough but not too much.
    Any tips on how to "see" this? I am pretty perceptive but when it comes to things like this i really need some more hints to go on - a little mentorship would be useful!

  7. #7
    Moderator xlr8's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tc0710
    Any tips on how to "see" this? I am pretty perceptive but when it comes to things like this i really need some more hints to go on - a little mentorship would be useful!
    Hmmm. Look at the stopwatch ;-)

    OK, I'm just yanking your chain, but on the other hand, the end result is really what matters so that is the ultimate test.

    Usually you can see low CNS excitation when the athlete looks "flat." I'm not sure how to describe it better than that...anyone else have a better description?

    On the other hand, too much CNS stimulation over a long period will result in eye twitches, restless sleep, perhaps a lack of appetite. The athlete may lack "bounce" or the ability to fully explode. However, some of these symptoms may appear just as a result of the anticipation of an important competition, so it is sometimes hard to tell.

    Not sure if this helps. Each athlete is different and the relationship between the coach and athlete as well as past experiences help with figuring some of this stuff out.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by xlr8
    Hmmm. Look at the stopwatch ;-)

    OK, I'm just yanking your chain, but on the other hand, the end result is really what matters so that is the ultimate test.

    Usually you can see low CNS excitation when the athlete looks "flat." I'm not sure how to describe it better than that...anyone else have a better description?

    On the other hand, too much CNS stimulation over a long period will result in eye twitches, restless sleep, perhaps a lack of appetite. The athlete may lack "bounce" or the ability to fully explode. However, some of these symptoms may appear just as a result of the anticipation of an important competition, so it is sometimes hard to tell.

    Not sure if this helps. Each athlete is different and the relationship between the coach and athlete as well as past experiences help with figuring some of this stuff out.
    What about heart rate. Testing resting heart rate at waking can give you an indication if you're overtraining if you're heart rate is higher when you wake.

  9. #9
    Plook, I like what everyone wrote but in case you care (not sure if this helps at all)...I know what this dude is going through, I had to deal with the same thing, I had a try-out once in Moncton , I took a train from montreal overnight and when I got there I had to go through all the orientation, moving into the host house ...this took 2-3 days, plus a dumb training camp barbecue, ect, all the while there were no weights and no access to the ice, tension was also high!! What I did was I lifted the day I left ( that morning), then I did a bodyweight circuit in the basement of my house, to get my heart rate up...the following days I did light-medium light sprints/run in my houseing family's yard and did plyo's (hops, jumps) nothing too taxing but I made sure I felt like I did something, this seemed to work pretty well, also the last workout I did before I left home was always a leg (focus) workout.....I am sure there are better ways but I do think he might want to do something, all the crap these teams make you do before the try-out kind of sucked, you just want to get on the ice and play! Tell that dude good luck!

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by asd123
    Plook, I like what everyone wrote but in case you care (not sure if this helps at all)...I know what this dude is going through, I had to deal with the same thing, I had a try-out once in Moncton , I took a train from montreal overnight and when I got there I had to go through all the orientation, moving into the host house ...this took 2-3 days, plus a dumb training camp barbecue, ect, all the while there were no weights and no access to the ice, tension was also high!! What I did was I lifted the day I left ( that morning), then I did a bodyweight circuit in the basement of my house, to get my heart rate up...the following days I did light-medium light sprints/run in my houseing family's yard and did plyo's (hops, jumps) nothing too taxing but I made sure I felt like I did something, this seemed to work pretty well, also the last workout I did before I left home was always a leg (focus) workout.....I am sure there are better ways but I do think he might want to do something, all the crap these teams make you do before the try-out kind of sucked, you just want to get on the ice and play! Tell that dude good luck!
    I forgot to mention that this kid is swimming 3x's per week and is also on the ice a few as well. He's a great skater but every single scout has mentioned the fact that he lack's "intensity" (people abuse the hell out of that word) and doesn't really play with much urgency. He's also really big and strong. Kind of a gentle giant. I'm trying to teach him how to push himself to the breaking point mentally. He always seems to have to be in control and not lose his cool. He's 15, 6'2" 200 and really lean. He also gets straight A's. Serious potential.

    I figured a few more workouts would help him more than it would hurt him. I figured 2-3 days off would've been fine.

    Did you make the team???

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