Page 3 of 17 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 13 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 161

Thread: plyo program

  1. #21
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Hoboken, NJ
    Posts
    2,908
    Ok, how short does the amortization phase have to be for it to be considered a plyo?

    Better yet. How long does the stretch reflex last?

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by QUIKAZHELL
    Ok, how short does the amortization phase have to be for it to be considered a plyo?

    Better yet. How long does the stretch reflex last?

    dude how can you can squat jump or skip a plyo- im just curious. im not an expert on plyos bc i have never done them really. just dont think the risk is worth it.

  3. #23
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Hoboken, NJ
    Posts
    2,908
    In nature and by definition a plyo uses the SSC and involve the 3 phases (Eccentric, Amortization, and Concentric). There are different level of plyos and traditional skipping and hopping would obviously be included in the lowest level.
    The only exception as you mentioned in your earlier posts would be "jumps" which have a pause aka too long of an amortization phase. How long I do not know. The stretch reflex would have to be dissipated(?).
    A simple hop would have a amortization which would not be long enough to be consisered a pause as neither would a skip.

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by QUIKAZHELL
    In nature and by definition a plyo uses the SSC and involve the 3 phases (Eccentric, Amortization, and Concentric). There are different level of plyos and traditional skipping and hopping would obviously be included in the lowest level.

    the movements u r talking bout are what i do on my low intensity bc the cns stress is low, so i wouldnt consider them plyos. plyos to me are depth drop/depth jumps/hurdle jumps everything else is jumps..

  5. #25
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Hoboken, NJ
    Posts
    2,908
    Quote Originally Posted by utfootball4
    the movements u r talking bout are what i do on my low intensity bc the cns stress is low, so i wouldnt consider them plyos. plyos to me are depth drop/depth jumps/hurdle jumps everything else is jumps..
    On your low intensity days you ARE doing low level plyos. Like it or not. lol.
    This discussion was not really about what YOU consider a plyo. But by definition what a plyo actually is.

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by QUIKAZHELL
    On your low intensity days you ARE doing low level plyos. Like it or not. lol.
    This discussion was not really about what YOU consider a plyo. But by definition what a plyo actually is.

    lol, like it or not its simple they are called jumps. let me think u were asking me i could care less what u think about something soo simple.

  7. #27
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Hoboken, NJ
    Posts
    2,908
    For example, every person that has been to a physician has experienced a plyometric event. When the doctor tapped under your kneecap, causing your leg to jerk, what do you think he/she was checking? The tapped caused a sudden stretch of the tendon that connects to all of the quadriceps (i.e. the muscle involved in extending the knee). Small receptors within the quadriceps create a stretch reflex, which makes the quadriceps responded by contracting explosively. The stretch reflex that caused the leg to extend is called the “myotatic reflex” and is the basis of plyometric physiology. The most common human movement, running, is completely a plyometric event. Other common plyometric events include throwing, swinging a golf club/bat, jumping and skipping!


    By Juan Carlos Santana, MEd, CSCS

  8. #28
    Gentlemen, all of these questions are clearly answered in Facts and Fallacies of Fitness by Siff.

    Some excerpts if you don't have a copy:

    "Plyometrics or the 'shock method' means precisely that - a method of applying mechanical shock to force the muscle to produce as much tension as possible. Depth jumps involving an explosive rebound after a relaxed drop from a height onto the ground are the best known form of lower body plyometrics. However, this shock loading may be imposed by any explosive action of the upper or lower extremities involving sudden changes of direction, not just with the legs. For example, a typical upper body plyometric drill is the rapid rebound throwing of a medicine ball between two athletes or off a mini-trampoline."

    "If the transition phase is prolonged by more than about 0.2 seconds, the action constitutes ordinary jumping and not classical plyometrics. A useful visualization is to imagine that the surface being touched by the hands or the feet during the plyometric contact phase is red hot, so that any prolonged contact would be dangerous."

    "Two broad classes of plyometrics may be recognized: impact plyometrics and non-impact plyometrics. During impact plyometrics the rebound is stimulated by contact with a surface or object, whereas the recoil in non-impact plyometrics is mediated by explosive eccentric action of the muscles that produce the movement. Depth jumps are a typical example of impact plyometrics, while snap kicks or rapidly-retracted punches in boxing or the martial arts exemplify non-impact plyometrics. Depending on the power of the movements, non-impact plyometrics may also be maximal or submaximal."

    Hope that helps to clarify a thing or two. There is much more in the section on "Plyometrics" in the book.

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Formula
    Gentlemen, all of these questions are clearly answered in Facts and Fallacies of Fitness by Siff.

    Some excerpts if you don't have a copy:

    "Plyometrics or the 'shock method' means precisely that - a method of applying mechanical shock to force the muscle to produce as much tension as possible. Depth jumps involving an explosive rebound after a relaxed drop from a height onto the ground are the best known form of lower body plyometrics. However, this shock loading may be imposed by any explosive action of the upper or lower extremities involving sudden changes of direction, not just with the legs. For example, a typical upper body plyometric drill is the rapid rebound throwing of a medicine ball between two athletes or off a mini-trampoline."

    "If the transition phase is prolonged by more than about 0.2 seconds, the action constitutes ordinary jumping and not classical plyometrics. A useful visualization is to imagine that the surface being touched by the hands or the feet during the plyometric contact phase is red hot, so that any prolonged contact would be dangerous."

    "Two broad classes of plyometrics may be recognized: impact plyometrics and non-impact plyometrics. During impact plyometrics the rebound is stimulated by contact with a surface or object, whereas the recoil in non-impact plyometrics is mediated by explosive eccentric action of the muscles that produce the movement. Depth jumps are a typical example of impact plyometrics, while snap kicks or rapidly-retracted punches in boxing or the martial arts exemplify non-impact plyometrics. Depending on the power of the movements, non-impact plyometrics may also be maximal or submaximal."

    Hope that helps to clarify a thing or two. There is much more in the section on "Plyometrics" in the book.
    Thanks dude, doesnt get any easier then that.

  10. #30
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Hoboken, NJ
    Posts
    2,908
    .2
    That is what I was looking for. Which means
    Jumping rope and playing hop scotch are both plyometric.

Similar Threads

  1. PâKOMUZé 2009: a “heroic” programme!
    By Rupert in forum Olympic Museum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 04-02-2009, 12:00 PM
  2. Poll on what supplement companies most of us use?
    By dlive11 in forum Nutrition Discussions
    Replies: 115
    Last Post: 01-06-2009, 02:26 PM
  3. Question for Charlie
    By Neospeed in forum Planning and Periodization
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 04-11-2003, 03:33 AM
  4. How I found these forums
    By Tarheel in forum Forum Archives
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 03-13-2003, 08:22 PM
  5. Help with training program!!
    By cbmm101 in forum Advanced Sprint Training
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 02-04-2003, 11:04 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •