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Thread: plyo program

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by utfootball4
    There’s no need to do a specialization type plyo program, its ok to throw in a couple jumps etc but true plyo aka shock should be use very little. Now if u have no indoor track etc then hey use what u can - its better then nothing.
    I'm not saying a specialized plyo program, but skips, hops, different kinds of jumps provide a multitude of stimuli outside of purely lifting and sprinting, light ones can be kept in the warm up then a couple of sets of one or two plyo's post speed, pre weights as a different type of strength training and so that the body wont have trouble adjusting to them should you need/choose to step up the volume.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by numba56
    I'm not saying a specialized plyo program, but skips, hops, different kinds of jumps provide a multitude of stimuli outside of purely lifting and sprinting, light ones can be kept in the warm up then a couple of sets of one or two plyo's post speed, pre weights as a different type of strength training and so that the body wont have trouble adjusting to them should you need/choose to step up the volume.

    skips and hop are not plyo, they are jumps.

  3. #13
    Oooo so lower body plyos dont consist of hops, skips, or jumps? So what exactly do they consist of?

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by utfootball4
    skips and hop are not plyo, they are jumps.
    Any movement that exploits the stretch shortening cycle in an effort to improve performance is a "plyometric".

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by QUIKAZHELL
    Any movement that exploits the stretch shortening cycle in an effort to improve performance is a "plyometric".

    nope, its a jump.

    "While commonly used to define the same thing, plyometrics and jumping exercises are actually not necessarily the same thing and correct classification of the two training modalities has implications for designing training sessions and training units. Strictly speaking, plyometric activity is one which elicits the stretch reflex. This typically happens when an eccentric contraction is immediately followed by a concentric contraction, resulting in a greater force than would be possible to produce voluntarily. This definition has two important points. First, plyometric activity does not have to be confined to only jumping or lower body activity, and secondly, not all jumping activities are plyometric in nature because not all jumping exercises elicit the stretch reflex.
    For example, rocket jumps have an amortization phase that is far too long and slow to elicit the stretch reflex, thus they are not a truly plyometric activity. Another example is static-dynamic jumps which eliminate the stretch reflex because the static phase resets the stretch-reflex response. The distinction between plyometric and jumping exercises is important in the design of training sessions and training units. Because of the stretch-reflex response, plyometric activities have the potential place a greater training load on the CNS than non-plyometric activity. Likewise, jumping exercises that are not plyometric in nature may be more intensive on the muscular system due to the need to overcome inertia with concentric strength alone. This distinction is important when attempting to make all units within a training session or training unit compatible and complimentary". elitetrack

  6. #16
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    Read what you just posted. Hops and skips ARE plyometric.

    "Strictly speaking, plyometric activity is one which elicits the stretch reflex. This typically happens when an eccentric contraction is immediately followed by a concentric contraction, resulting in a greater force than would be possible to produce voluntarily."

    Skips and hops fits this criteria, no?

  7. #17
    i would still say no, lets say if u r talking bout single leg speed hops ok yes, but just simple skipping and hopping -no.

    "For example, rocket jumps have an amortization phase that is far too long and slow to elicit the stretch reflex, thus they are not a truly plyometric activity. Another example is static-dynamic jumps which eliminate the stretch reflex because the static phase resets the stretch-reflex response"

  8. #18
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    How about jumping rope?

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by QUIKAZHELL
    How about jumping rope?

    lol, low intensity jump movement.

  10. #20
    So what exactly do you consider lower body plyos?

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