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Thread: fruit and fat?

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Krasnayafleur
    by immediately i really meant a half hour or so before if that makes a difference. i had an iron deficiency when i was little, but the last time i had a blood test things were within normal range (oct or nov.) taking a multivit has helped there.

    i have found a bulk of information on this topic, i will be poring through it at length
    if you haven't got any problems with this practice (i.e., 30 min before), that's fine; if you feel somewhat "down" at times, have a look at the CHO source (i.e., high vs. low GI)

    red meat is not the only source for iron, but iron from other sources may not be easily absorbed (e.g., vegetables); vit C some time before eating any source of iron helps in absorption, whereas coffee/tea/calcium have the reverse effects

    not an expert on diet, but i am not sure by how much a multi-vitamin can really help your iron STORES; it might be more effective if taken on its own -although at times it is a bit heavy on stomach

    just to add, or confirm some of your info, PM me your email, if you want, for a few comments about iron deficiency and how to prevent it -it's for endurance runners mainly, but...
    "We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence then, is not an act, but a habit" Aristotle

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Krasnayafleur
    Would a CKD even be appropriate for someone like me? I am very interested in it but it seems geared to body-builders and perhaps not a smart idea for me (i train as a multi-eventer)

    I have read through a lot of the info on the site and i can understand the rationale behind cutting out excess carb intake during the day, but i include carbs in my PWO shake... wouldn't you still want to do this to promote recovery, rather than waiting for the once-a-week carb loading?
    Look into a custom tailored CKD diet further before you give up on it. If you have the right metabolic type, it could work great for you, including giving you MORE energy and BETTER recovery. A place to start in determining if your metabolic type is right for a CKD diet (or more appropriately a carb-restrictive diet): pay attention to how you feel after a carb-heavy meal. Does it make you sleepy and lethargic? Not satisfied? Hungry again shortly afterwards? If so, you might do better with less carbs at each meal (although not necessarily to the point of ketosis).

    I have the most energy, strength, and recuperative ability when I avoid sugar, grains, pasta, rice, breads, etc. and restrict my carb sources to plenty of fruits, veggies, and raw milk. It might be hard to call this a CKD diet, but I definitely find myself in ketosis throughout the week, without any side effects except desirable ones like fat loss.

    A note on the GI of fruit: remember that the actual GI will be the total GI of the whole meal. This means that if you add low glycemic foods to your high glycemic fruits, the total GI of the meal will be lower. Fiber (as already noted), fat, protein, and acidity will all contribute to a lower GI.

    When determining the best diet for yourself, remember the "Everybody is different" mantra. You have to find out what works best for you.

  3. #23
    Krasnayafleur
    Guest
    thanks for the response...

    I mostly avoid grains, cereal, rice, pasta as well. I'm not a milk drinker, but I am a big fruit and veggie person so it would be nearly impossible for me to spring for the no-carb version of this diet. I am looking more closely into its modifications and altering WHEN and how much carbs i eat (esp fruit) instead of trying to live on cheese and turkey.

    i am pretty sensitive to the sugar high and subsequent crash after eating high-carb meals. I do find that if i restrict too much, i get very specific cravings for bread!

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Krasnayafleur
    thanks for the response...

    I mostly avoid grains, cereal, rice, pasta as well. I'm not a milk drinker, but I am a big fruit and veggie person so it would be nearly impossible for me to spring for the no-carb version of this diet. I am looking more closely into its modifications and altering WHEN and how much carbs i eat (esp fruit) instead of trying to live on cheese and turkey.

    i am pretty sensitive to the sugar high and subsequent crash after eating high-carb meals. I do find that if i restrict too much, i get very specific cravings for bread!
    The exact definition of a "CKD" is fairly vague and far-reaching the way most people use it. I am using it loosely at least. What I meant is to not be afraid of dipping into ketosis here and there whether it is planned or not. You don't have to restrict carbs to zero in order to get into ketosis, especially if your total calories aren't high, you eat a lot of (good) fat, and you have a high activity level.

    It may be because I have so much experience with carb-restriction diets (and therefore my metabolism is "trained"), but I can eat quite a bit of vegetables and fruit and a little bit of milk and still go into ketosis. My carb cravings diminish noticeably once I do get into ketosis and I find that I have to avoid whatever I crave COMPLETELY in order to get rid of the cravings, for example, if I have one piece of bread every other day, I will crave bread constantly. No bread at all, no cravings at all.

    This is all easier said than done of course, and I wish I stuck to it more often because I feel great when I do it.

    Good luck!

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Krasnayafleur
    I I end up eating a lot of fruits and vegetables and I am becoming aware that high glycemic fruits can actually cause fat storage. Is this an issue of time of day? Quantity? Certain fruits are better than others?
    IMO Glycemic Load is more usefull to look at especially with fruit. Even fruit with a high glycmic index usually contains only around 10% sugar (bananas have high carb content with 22%).
    And high glycemic index is relative, if you compare glycemic indexes of fruit to to that of pasta or bread they aren't that high. Glycemic load is much lower though!

    Fat storage is IMO more a function of total kcal intake.

    And fear of fructose in fruit filling up liver glycogen and any excess going to fat is exaggerated.
    I eat about 1kg of fruit and which is only around 30g fructose. Makes more sense to worry about the fructose contents of soft drinks or anything else with HFCS or sucrose.

  6. #26
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    5

    Re: fruit and fat?

    Hi Krasnayafleur,
    Raw food controls your weight and boost your energy level for physical activities. Raw food prevent from caner, diabetes, high blood pressure, stroke and heart disease.

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