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Thread: Coach Ange's blog

  1. #61
    Administrator Angela Coon's Avatar
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    Re: Coach Ange's blog

    Quote Originally Posted by Angela Coon View Post
    BRETT'S POSTED RESPONSE

    Re: Seeking advice, ridculous times and inconsistencies
    Hey Ange, thanks for your thorough responses. To answer your questions, since the pandemic I have been working less and have more time and energy to devote to training. For the past several months I have been able to dedicate myself to two speed sessions a week, two weight sessions, along with 2-3 tempo and ab sessions a week. Due to work and location, my training for the past couple of year has been meager, disorganized, and hodge podge. But I have been able to establish my current regimen due to my situation.

    As far as my actual training plan, I am focused on the 60m and so I am using an S-L scheme. Essentially one of the speed sessions I focus on acceleration more and the other more emphasis on max v. Progressing gradually 10m at a time. Starting with trying to perfect 10-20, then 20-30, 30-40. Lately session might look like 3x20mB, 2x(2-3x)40mB. So, volumes around 300m or so. I will progress to more 50-60m in these next few weeks. Tempo-wise, I stick with about 1000-2000m per session. With weights, I have been doing mostly 3x5 on bench and squat, I don't have any auxiliary lift equipment, but it gets the job done, and I've been about the strongest I've ever been at 5'10" 170lbs and my best set for bench has been 3x5x255lbs and squat being 3x5x435 at a parallel depth. I am quite flexible and do massage and additional stretching on tempo days. The volumes and intensities of my training are on the more conservative side as I've previously done speed volumes over 400 in the past. Having a written plan and not going beyond it, always trying to do less, has definitely helped me to avoid tightness in tiredness. So overall I do feel very good. I suspect that my inconsistencies are probably a result of not relaxing, and perhaps this is due to doing loads of high intensity explosive work at too high of an effort. I have been considering doing control speed (very submaximal and longer runs) as it could give me a better opportunity to relax. All the short near-max sprints have really done wonders for my starts, my best times for 20m being 2.77 and 30m being 3.89, but I have been all over the place going past 30. So I'm thinking maybe doing more upright work may provide the opportunity for more practice in that position and elicit more relaxation. Constantly reviewing the lectures and books from CF, I also just reviewed a seminar Charlie did for the SWIS symposium. Thank you for your responses.

    Brett, how do you improve your speed for 60m without doing repeat 60's?
    I have summarized in a previous post recently on this thread defining speed, speed endurance, specific and special endurance as a review for everyone reading this who asks similar questions about
    Why am I not faster?

  2. #62
    Administrator Angela Coon's Avatar
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    Re: Coach Ange's blog

    Brett, you have given me lots of data but just because you are doing S to L, that does not mean you will get away with avoiding the routine performance of including 60m reps and 100's or 120's or on occasion 150's.

    On a scale of 1 to 10, 10 being the most fit, how would you rank your overall fitness? ( it's the base by which all other variables of your training will improve from)

    If tempo plays any role at all it's to ensure fitness. I don't care what the debate is, I see lazy all the time and it provides excellent and easy assurance of fitness.

    Do people believe that speed will be improved by doing repeat 10's and 20's and 30's? Up to a point yes they will. But correct me if I am wrong as you've told us nothing about any of your longer training? speed endurance as one example.

    " I do 3 x 5 bench and squat" = you do this all the time? LOL.
    ... this tells me nothing about how strong you are.
    Oh you said you have never been stronger?
    THat's good but maybe that's because you are leaving your speed at the track and not prioritizing the speed part of the training.
    NO, I am not charlie but I don't need to be.
    What I know for sure is our eyes can tell us the most as coaches.
    It's clear you have a great deal of knowledge but many things including a few I have commented on don't equal method to give you CONSISTENT SPEED RESULTS.
    Last edited by Angela Coon; 01-05-2022 at 03:23 PM.

  3. #63
    Administrator Angela Coon's Avatar
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    Re: Coach Ange's blog

    by the way, relaxing is often a function of feeling confident about what you are doing for training. If you are not feeling good about your training it's difficult to allow things happen as they should.

    Are you certain that you are doing all the things you need to do at the track to ensure the quality of your speed training is as good as possible all of the time?

    My comment about your lifting was directed towards cycling how you lift at what time of year not just lifting for strength all of the time. Lifting will always compete with your speed and that's why it's worth noting.

    My warm up was one full hour as an athlete. I still do most of the components of my training warm up, then I do strides even if it's on the treadmill and then I do 3 sets of 10 or 15 meters in the gym or outside, take 3 to 5 minutes and see if I am able to do another set or 2 more sets of 3 runs over 10 to 15 m. IF I still feel great after this which usually is near one full hour I carefully choose a few lifts. Bench, squats or lunges. I'll do 6 reps of bench, take a 3 or 4 min break and then go do a walking lunge over 20m. Then I will take 3 or 4 minutes again and ask myself am I better to leave now or what more if anything am I able to do and still feel great? As soon as you or I perceive fatigue, it's already too long of a session...... We have already dipped a bit too low past our baseline and it's going to take more than 48 hours to restore our best training self. ( this is training 101 and it's worth making comments about repeatedly)

    this is a tiny example of what I am able to do now but I will tell you I am using the same principles of training that i have always followed. I hope it's helpful.

  4. #64
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    Re: Coach Ange's blog

    Yeah idk. I think that my emphasis on acceleration work is because I seem to run a lot differently out of the blocks than from a standing start. I simply cannot generate the same speed without having the aggressive angles present, and so I decided to not have 60m repeats in the program. But yeah your point seems valid since a lot of people have been known to do repeat 60s. Michael Johnson and Clyde Hart did them, Pietro Mennea, and I'm pretty sure John Smith as well as guys like Borzov did them too so it is interesting to see that kind of work being found commonplace among different locations and eras for that matter. So yeah I have been reconsidering this type of work.

    Strength progression is classical block style. Started out 8-10 reps during GPP, 6-8 reps early SPP, and late SPP sets of 3-5 reps. To answer your question regarding general fitness I would rate myself an 8 out of 10. Doing only 2 speed sessions a week allows me to consistently do 4-5 tempo sessions in a week for a total volume around 6-8km, and as I've already mentioned previously my lifting has certainly been consistent. I am sure that 60m repeats would add to specific fitness, as well as provide another opportunity to improve relaxation since the acceleration limit is present. So again thank you for bringing that up.

    Brett,

    Everyone runs differently out of the blocks then from a standing start.

    *The cost of performing block starts with all your runs is significant. Yes, you need to practice block starts but it needs to be added as an intense aspect of your training and counted accordingly.

    (* cost of performing block starts vs standing starts= when I use the term 'cost' I am referring to the physical cost which includes muscular as well as CNS cost. You might think of starts as a high intensity exercise. We know it's not medium intensity which according to Charlie's methods is a waste of time and for sure we know block starts are NOT low intensity.)

    If I were doing block starts I would do so after my hour warm up as part of the speed session. The block starts were chosen to go as the first exercise. Why? Because it requires you to be at your best, your freshest and sharpest. This is true for every second of sprinting that you perform and it's especially true for starts because it's an explosive, powerful movement.
    Last edited by Angela Coon; 01-07-2022 at 02:49 PM.

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    Re: Coach Ange's blog

    What you mentioned about confidence is really important too. I think the bottom line is that confidence shifts things to the hind-brain (good for speed). On the opposite end of the spectrum would be self-consciousness, or doubt, and that would bring a shift towards the fore-brain (bad for speed).

  6. #66
    Administrator Angela Coon's Avatar
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    Re: Coach Ange's blog

    Quote Originally Posted by Brett View Post
    What you mentioned about confidence is really important too. I think the bottom line is that confidence shifts things to the hind-brain (good for speed). On the opposite end of the spectrum would be self-consciousness, or doubt, and that would bring a shift towards the fore-brain (bad for speed).
    This is exactly the case for many aspects of learning

  7. #67
    Administrator Angela Coon's Avatar
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    Re: Coach Ange's blog

    "I simply cannot generate the same speed without having the aggressive angles present,"

    Well guess what? You need to change this. Or do you? Do we debate it? Do we go to one of the sites who sells what ever and ask the question and get a 5 billion word article that supports what ever is being sold and advertised? You can do that if you want but I assure you that if you have X amount of energy and you waste a good portion of that on your start, how the heck do you expect to get faster? Forget about doing 10's or 60's etc as you have LEFT YOUR SPEED potential in the starting blocks. ( quite literally)

    The angles performed in a standing start are the very angles you need to perform and REPEAT to achieve your potential.

    Likely you have not yet been shown how to perform a standing start. Maybe you have and can't yet repeat it or you feel you are getting too light or sore? Any of these scenarios are normal.

  8. #68
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    Re: Coach Ange's blog

    Quote Originally Posted by Angela Coon View Post
    "I simply cannot generate the same speed without having the aggressive angles present,"

    Well guess what? You need to change this. Or do you? Do we debate it? Do we go to one of the sites who sells what ever and ask the question and get a 5 billion word article that supports what ever is being sold and advertised? You can do that if you want but I assure you that if you have X amount of energy and you waste a good portion of that on your start, how the heck do you expect to get faster? Forget about doing 10's or 60's etc as you have LEFT YOUR SPEED potential in the starting blocks. ( quite literally)

    The angles performed in a standing start are the very angles you need to perform and REPEAT to achieve your potential.

    Likely you have not yet been shown how to perform a standing start. Maybe you have and can't yet repeat it or you feel you are getting too light or sore? Any of these scenarios are normal.

    Look, I'm not saying these things to prove I'm right. Obviously I am pointing out an error in myself and seeking help for it. I did not come here to debate. But yeah I agree that I should be doing standing starts. If I can improve that it should improve other forms of acceleration. I suppose it could be said that blocks essentially do some of the work for you in a sense, as the angle of the pedals orient your force more horizontally. Without blocks you have to find a way to align the proper direction of forces yourself. One of the other differences is the deeper angles achieved in blocks (around 90-100 degrees on the first two steps). Without them, you need to coordinate these deep angles yourself. Necessary skills of acceleration that I will work on.

  9. #69

    Re: Coach Ange's blog

    Angie,

    How would you model the intensity of a block start compared to an individual fast sprint, perhaps 95%, over say 40m. I aim for something like 200m of hi intensity work based around say 5x40m.

    If executing block position starts I aim for say 3x20 from blocks + 2x40 from standing. In other words block + 20m equals 40m from standing. I like 20m because it is long enough to model the full block position start+much of the acceleration phase.

    The other thing i sometimes do is what i call push offs from block position. This is a lower intensity start + about 8 strides all in relaxed mode. Purely to model body angles.

    Does this make sense ?

  10. #70
    Administrator Angela Coon's Avatar
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    Re: Coach Ange's blog

    Quote Originally Posted by Brett View Post
    Look, I'm not saying these things to prove I'm right. Obviously I am pointing out an error in myself and seeking help for it. I did not come here to debate. But yeah I agree that I should be doing standing starts. If I can improve that it should improve other forms of acceleration. I suppose it could be said that blocks essentially do some of the work for you in a sense, as the angle of the pedals orient your force more horizontally. Without blocks you have to find a way to align the proper direction of forces yourself. One of the other differences is the deeper angles achieved in blocks (around 90-100 degrees on the first two steps). Without them, you need to coordinate these deep angles yourself. Necessary skills of acceleration that I will work on.
    Brett,

    Who said there was a debate?

    The proof of the sprinting is on the track right? And you are either getting what you need and want or not. Part of the reason standing starts are useful is to strengthen the specific movement and angles in the crouched position needed to maintain the angles of sprinting. If you aren't able to hold a crouch position to perform standing starts, how to you routinely train this area? The position of a crouched start will assist in the development of low, mid and upper back as well as the hip region ( needed for speed work) and ligament strength all over body. The groin, the hip and ankle angles are included in the mix and all while not costing you the same as block work. We need to do block work but we need to be aware that we need higher volumes of repetitive speed work is necessary.
    The other aspect of the block work is while specificity is important for block work as in speed work, there are many other aspects of training that will go into improving your start out side of reps of block work.

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