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Thread: Training a bunch of high school athletes (asking for feedback)

  1. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
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    117

    Re: Training a bunch of high school athletes (asking for feedback)

    Love the perspective James. Tenacity should always be upheld. Will seriously take your considerations.

  2. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    117

    Re: Training a bunch of high school athletes (asking for feedback)

    Ghosting...

    How the season went...

    Perhaps it was not ideal for the athletes who wanted to qualify further into championships and eventually OFSSA (=Olympics to anyone in Ontario)... but with my heart I'd say it was a good season! I wished that they found it the same way.

    Some things I enjoyed fully:

    • the relationship I had with some of the athletes. I never truly got to know the athletes because of the very little time we had (2 sessions a week x 4). So I made the hurdlers fill out a form that would explicitly list their hobbies, what kind of training they thought they needed, what their goals were. One girl who was only half into practices handed me the form and under the box of "What do I need to do" she had this: "listen to jccc110m more". It was a wonderful feeling. I understood that beyond coaching technically, you are just an interacting person. I love that she found whatever I was saying to be worthwhile to pay attention to.
    • Some people really do care and you have to help them to your best. One girl found me after our first practice together and told me about a sore ankle. I got her email and sent her some information (ELDOA, no sugar, contrast showers). She was bought in from the very first session. Both of us always went overtime. Positioning her in the blocks, teaching her med ball throws. She was so willing to learn. One time she got frustrated and sad because she could never take off with the correct foot into the hurdle. That moment I knew I needed to comfort her, tell her that it will come, just try that again please... It's these moments that really inspire leadership... friendship.. compassion in a coaching relationship. She truly made me a better, caring person. To move forward I needed to consider how to not only preserve technical quality but also give her the coaching she thinks she needs... to address and account for her emotions as well. And to athletes like this girl, I hope that what I'm saying is always the best way. My previous coach, commenting on her athlete's injury said this wonderfully generous goal of hers: "When he got hurt I felt that it was on me. So I vowed to become a better coach, to learn more... to almost make it up to him." People that care inspire me to become a better person, better coach so to respect the trust they've placed in me.

    Some things I need to work on:

    • One thing I learned too late was that when you coach, don't just give them your lens on what needs to be improved, be accountable for their lens also. Most of the hurdlers hated me as I didn't bother talking about hurdle technique. My reasoning was that I didn't have to. If you couldn't make it to H1 at a good enough and fast enough rhythm, I'm wasting my time and yours. Learn how to get to the first hurdle and then we can talk. If I appreciated their side of the relationship and given them hurdle instruction earlier on, I might've made a good enough case to get them investing in the acceleration into one. Sometimes you need to travel out of the 'need to do' zone and get into the 'want to do' and 'nice to do'
    • Get them GI Joe looking to maximize the short amount of time you have. The motley amount of drills I used was nice if I had athletes for the full preparation periods but I only had one month. If I improved body composition with medball/bodyweight circuits I would've maximized the training effect. Also lower coordination level power exercises would've helped a bunch. Skips for distance/height, med ball throws, long sprint drills. I liked putting them in proper acceleration positions with walls and partner resisted drills but it's all moot when they don't have the strength to hold them.
    • Run more. Challenge reactivity levels, increase neuromuscular fitness, facilitate technique. Most athletes needed just to get out and challenge their nervous system. I got too cute and caught up in the Technique Trap.



    This experience was education for a lifetime.
    Last edited by jccc110m; 08-12-2016 at 09:14 PM.

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