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Thread: Update on my current training

  1. #81
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    Re: Update on my current training

    Also guys, in regards to my start, would what Tellez teaches be something you'd recommend?

  2. #82
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    Re: Update on my current training


  3. #83
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    Re: Update on my current training

    Quote Originally Posted by Brett View Post
    Some of these drills can be very helpful if you know why you're doing what you're doing, and if you are doing them correctly!

  4. #84

    Re: Update on my current training

    Quote Originally Posted by T-Slow View Post
    Some of these drills can be very helpful if you know why you're doing what you're doing, and if you are doing them correctly!
    I've messed around with a few of these by myself in the backyard - exaggerating some of the movements and treating them as plyometrics rather than as "drills." Felt sore the next day, but I have no idea if they're effective as plyos.

    Crazy?

  5. #85
    Administrator Angela Coon's Avatar
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    Re: Update on my current training

    stylee, I don't think you are crazy for trying something. It's not crazy to be sore from something that is different as there is specificity to all training. If you kept repeating any drill, you would adapt and not get sore. Constant changing of drills creates soreness. WE all know this.

    My question might be is what performing these drills will offer you? Are they replacing Power Speed? Are these drills performed on top of Power Speed?

    I think T Slow's point about doing a drill correctly is very important because most drills I see online and at the track are done without a coach watching and or somewhat worse, the drill is not corrected.

    Where does a person go to learn great drills ? Good questions right?

    Search out the best all time results and accomplishments of the top coaches you wish to study from, look for the uniform traits within the training program and then slowly and methodically make changes with intent if needed. ( over time ).

    Posted many times on this site have been the drills that Bert Hill video taped while Charlie and I were in Detroit with the Lions. On this tape, you will see the key drills we spent 6 days a week doing as part of an hour long warm up.

    Yes, there are countless other drills but which ones work and who is going to weed through them and convince me they are better ( and why are they better?) then the ones used to produced historic results.

  6. #86

    Re: Update on my current training

    Quote Originally Posted by Angela Coon View Post
    stylee, I don't think you are crazy for trying something. It's not crazy to be sore from something that is different as there is specificity to all training. If you kept repeating any drill, you would adapt and not get sore. Constant changing of drills creates soreness. WE all know this.

    My question might be is what performing these drills will offer you? Are they replacing Power Speed? Are these drills performed on top of Power Speed?

    I think T Slow's point about doing a drill correctly is very important because most drills I see online and at the track are done without a coach watching and or somewhat worse, the drill is not corrected.

    Where does a person go to learn great drills ? Good questions right?

    Search out the best all time results and accomplishments of the top coaches you wish to study from, look for the uniform traits within the training program and then slowly and methodically make changes with intent if needed. ( over time ).

    Posted many times on this site have been the drills that Bert Hill video taped while Charlie and I were in Detroit with the Lions. On this tape, you will see the key drills we spent 6 days a week doing as part of an hour long warm up.

    Yes, there are countless other drills but which ones work and who is going to weed through them and convince me they are better ( and why are they better?) then the ones used to produced historic results.
    One of the things I fooled around with is the drill they're doing at around 4:30, the leg cock-hammer down thing.
    I did it regular speed and like they do it here, one leg at a time. Then I did it at that speed again, but alternating legs.
    Finally, I sped it up, so it was a sprint - but with an exaggerated emphasis on that downward PUNCH action with the frontside leg. Focus is on not letting that leg get too far in front. The cue I was working with was PUNCH-BOUNCE, so that I wasn't staying on the ground and pushhhhhhing off; I made it a *POP*.

    To me, if I like it and can apply it, I'd use it as an occasional alternative to conventional bounds in our plyometric training. Bounds are more of a "push" AFTER ground contact to me, whereas I think these hammer-downs can be used for maximizing the impact at ground contact.

    I don't want my guys to fall back to some of this as cues for sprinting - I don't like the idea of consciously doing "punch the track!" or "paw back!" when guys are running. Like Charlie said - sprinting is, at its best, hindbrain activity. "Pawback" cues strike me as a recipe for increasing ground contact time.

    However, like I said, the idea of emphasizing the front-side movement and the initial ground strike through plyometrics appeals to me.

  7. #87

    Re: Update on my current training

    Angela,
    I take it these are the videos you mean?
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UuCMxAEjlmQ

    I've watched that several times in the past. I'm a big fan of the skip bound at around 1:42.
    Is there any focus on getting distance in that one, or is just about getting a big push up off the ground?

    At 2:10 you do a speed bound. Then the next guy does it and Charlie says "Good position emphasis on forward, not up."
    Is the idea to go as far as you can with each one without letting the foot fall in front of the body? Or is it more just about "Go forward and keep your rhythm" ?

  8. #88
    Administrator Angela Coon's Avatar
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    Re: Update on my current training

    Stylee,

    Thank you for providing the link. This is the video Bert Hill taped and I was speaking about.

    The skip bound
    I am doing at 1:11 is not very good. The skip bound I am doing again at 1:42 is not much better.

    You want to look for a few things. Is my back straight? No.

    Are my shoulders back? No.

    What are the position of the hips? I am not able to extend my hips forward or keep them up. ( easier said then done as this is at hand what type of strength you need to maintain top speed).

    Much of the sprinting movement happens with the combination of the strength and hip mobility. This is why we did so many exercises such as leg swings, donkey kicks and side leg raises , trail leg forward and backward and hurdle walk overs.

    I am not sure I understand what you are asking about the focus of the skip bound? Think about skipping while simultaneously using power to execute skip? I guess the later is how I understood it. You are not looking for distance but you are trying have a sharpness of contact when you touch the ground . Does this make sense? ( I like to listen for what kind of sound happens from the contact. You can tell a great deal from the sounds you hear with a foot hitting the ground. )

    The Speed Bound is different than the skip bound. I liked the speed bound more but apparently I was not ever great at this type of bound either. @ 2:35 I am doing okay. If I had been stronger it would have been the best. You can see the guys have far more strength but they lack the mobility. I am not sure it's all about going as far as you can. Rhythm is very important you can see but it's a balance of what needs to come together to get the most of a bound as a drill.

  9. #89
    Administrator Angela Coon's Avatar
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    Re: Update on my current training

    I think you are talking about the LS video at 4:30?

    I was trying to make some sense of what is going on there but it's not clear to me.

    We do a drill that we called a " Straight leg drill" and it was performed over 10 or 20 or 30 meters depending on the time of year and well it was performed.

    You move forward with your legs straight and pull back. I am not sure why you would ever practice this movement standing still.

  10. #90

    Re: Update on my current training

    Quote Originally Posted by Angela Coon View Post
    Stylee,

    Thank you for providing the link. This is the video Bert Hill taped and I was speaking about.

    The skip bound
    I am doing at 1:11 is not very good. The skip bound I am doing again at 1:42 is not much better.

    You want to look for a few things. Is my back straight? No.

    Are my shoulders back? No.

    What are the position of the hips? I am not able to extend my hips forward or keep them up. ( easier said then done as this is at hand what type of strength you need to maintain top speed).

    Much of the sprinting movement happens with the combination of the strength and hip mobility. This is why we did so many exercises such as leg swings, donkey kicks and side leg raises , trail leg forward and backward and hurdle walk overs.

    I am not sure I understand what you are asking about the focus of the skip bound? Think about skipping while simultaneously using power to execute skip? I guess the later is how I understood it. You are not looking for distance but you are trying have a sharpness of contact when you touch the ground . Does this make sense? ( I like to listen for what kind of sound happens from the contact. You can tell a great deal from the sounds you hear with a foot hitting the ground. )

    The Speed Bound is different than the skip bound. I liked the speed bound more but apparently I was not ever great at this type of bound either. @ 2:35 I am doing okay. If I had been stronger it would have been the best. You can see the guys have far more strength but they lack the mobility. I am not sure it's all about going as far as you can. Rhythm is very important you can see but it's a balance of what needs to come together to get the most of a bound as a drill.

    Thanks for the explanations. Very helpful.

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