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Thread: Update on my current training

  1. #61
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    Re: Update on my current training

    Quote Originally Posted by lkh View Post
    I don't know if I can remember enough detail from 5 years ago that you can look this up, but there was a thread started by Gerald Phiri (G-force on here) asking about some of this. Charlie said, as mentioned above, that in comp SE comes in races (which might be 100+200 if there aren't qualifying heats), and everything else is sub-max. Charlie mentioned doing things like 2X150 sub-max mid week, and you might only have another session of starts, which are also sub-max.

    You have to deal with the fact that there are fiber conversions, and work on the track and/or in the weight room causes a conversion of II b/x => IIa, and the way you reverse this is mostly a lot of rest, meaning maintenance in weights and sub-max on the track in everything except races (not just SE or special endurance).
    When you say that you reverse the conversion of IIb/x to IIa through maintenance in weights and sub-max on the track, does it mean your IIb/x fibers that turned into IIa will turn into IIb/x fibers again?? I thought it requires complete rest in order for reverse-conversion to occur. Does just going into a sort of peaking/maintenance schedule actually turn your fibers into IIb/x again, resulting in greater speed? Is this one of the ways in which peaking does occur? (in addition to refreshing of the CNS and optimization of muscle tones) How long of peaking/maintenance period is needed to see such reverse-conversion?

    Thank you.

  2. #62
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    Re: Update on my current training

    Quote Originally Posted by kwave View Post
    When you say that you reverse the conversion of IIb/x to IIa through maintenance in weights and sub-max on the track, does it mean your IIb/x fibers that turned into IIa will turn into IIb/x fibers again?? I thought it requires complete rest in order for reverse-conversion to occur. Does just going into a sort of peaking/maintenance schedule actually turn your fibers into IIb/x again, resulting in greater speed? Is this one of the ways in which peaking does occur? (in addition to refreshing of the CNS and optimization of muscle tones) How long of peaking/maintenance period is needed to see such reverse-conversion?

    Thank you.
    Interesting..

  3. #63
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    Re: Update on my current training

    Hey all. Thank you everyone for your generosity, kindness, and especially patience. I really do appreciate the extra time and effort you all have put in in trying to help me reach my goals. I know it has been frustrating for many of you, and I apologize for making things so frustrating. Some times, I just can't seem to be able to help holding in all of the negativity that has been branded into me. I am fully aware and completely understand that I have not trained myself properly, of course, this is because of my inability to be able to handle my own emotions and reactions to what I do. At any rate, I ran 11.81 in better conditions than last week, on a faster track, and 2.0 wind, if that really means anything. (last week was 11.79). Anyhow, I am 22 years old and my PR (11.15) is from when I was 19, three years ago, as some of you may know. I realize now I just need to accept my fate for what it is and stop fighting it. I'm about to graduate next month and I need to figure my life out. It's like I'm going through a mid-life crisis already at the age of 22. My life's number one goal for the past two years has to PR again. It just had a personal meaning to me, it would have brought me the validation I need, and would have done justice to what happened to me in 2013. But I see now it just is not destined to be. I lost, I lost a long time ago, and I need to accept it. I just can't keep living with this dark cloud over me. I need to stop letting myself down and come to terms with the reality of things that I am no longer what I once was. Anyways, I'm going to be taking a leave for a while to figure out what I'm going to do. Thanks again. Bye for now.

  4. #64

    Re: Update on my current training

    You're 22. Your peak years are still way ahead of you...

  5. #65
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    Re: Update on my current training

    Quote Originally Posted by Brett View Post
    Hey all. Thank you everyone for your generosity, kindness, and especially patience. I really do appreciate the extra time and effort you all have put in in trying to help me reach my goals. I know it has been frustrating for many of you, and I apologize for making things so frustrating. Some times, I just can't seem to be able to help holding in all of the negativity that has been branded into me. I am fully aware and completely understand that I have not trained myself properly, of course, this is because of my inability to be able to handle my own emotions and reactions to what I do. At any rate, I ran 11.81 in better conditions than last week, on a faster track, and 2.0 wind, if that really means anything. (last week was 11.79). Anyhow, I am 22 years old and my PR (11.15) is from when I was 19, three years ago, as some of you may know. I realize now I just need to accept my fate for what it is and stop fighting it. I'm about to graduate next month and I need to figure my life out. It's like I'm going through a mid-life crisis already at the age of 22. My life's number one goal for the past two years has to PR again. It just had a personal meaning to me, it would have brought me the validation I need, and would have done justice to what happened to me in 2013. But I see now it just is not destined to be. I lost, I lost a long time ago, and I need to accept it. I just can't keep living with this dark cloud over me. I need to stop letting myself down and come to terms with the reality of things that I am no longer what I once was. Anyways, I'm going to be taking a leave for a while to figure out what I'm going to do. Thanks again. Bye for now.
    Hey Brett, I've been through something very similar as you as far as training goes. Twice actually. When I was in HS, I hit 11.30 FAT at 17 years old but after that my life went downhill fast. I had disc surgery when I was 18 years old, missed my entire senior year of football and track. I had accepted the fact that I was only going to be good enough for open meets/unattached at best. Once I finally got over this injury which was a year later I decided that I just wanted to compete in open meets. To make a long story short, I didn't come close to reaching my old personal best. I had thought that I had done everything right to run somewhat close to my old PB but I didn't. I also had thought that I had better training than the way I was trained by my idiot HS coaches, but I too made some bad mistakes looking back at my old journals. It all ended after I strained my hamstring during mid-season doing 300yd tempo runs (stupid mistake). I moved on from track after that because I had found better opportunities in sports that I was better at.

    About 5 years later, I went through a very similar cycle again with the sport of Weightlifting. Except this time, my ability to compete in sports is permanently over because of a career ending injury that happened because of a surgical complication. There were a lot of times where I thought "why bother even being involved in athletics anymore as a career". Because like you, I chose to have a career in coaching. The honest truth is that I like training way too much to give it up. My injury permanently took away the ability for me to squat below parallel without having deep pain. But I have found a way to train around it as well as crush and continue to crush personal records prior to my injury. Not only this, but I have gained a ton of respect from people around me by having the ability to express my passion to train hard and be strong.

    There will be several athletes that are going to question your expertise as a sport coach, strength coach, or sport scientist. At my last job, I was stuck working with 15 NFL prospects getting ready for the combine. They were all skeptical of my knowledge as to how to help them get stronger through improving their technique. The third week I was working with them, one of the players stumbled upon a video of me hang power cleaning 300lbs weighing 170. He then showed it to all of the other combine guys and they had all viewed me differently after that. Aside from this, there have been a few other instances where my ability to "walk the talk" helped me gain more respect from players and sport coaches than coaches or sport science nerds who didn't train at all and looked like the average joe.

    RB34 on this site is a great inspiration to be that coach who walks the talk. He's been on this site for a while and trains hard well into his 30s. If you give it all up now, you are going to miss out on a huge opportunity to better yourself in life. I'd give anything to be back into your shoes right now. You wouldn't be on this site if you weren't passionate about training hard to become a better athlete. Like a lot of people on this site, you probably live to train. Don't give up on what you enjoy doing. Mistakes should be taken as a training tool to get better.

  6. #66

    Re: Update on my current training

    Hi Brett,

    It sounds to me like you are a bit too quick to give up. This is the second time you're ready to throw the towel within a few months. You haven't had the proper consistent buildup needed to be running near your PB right now. The season I ran my PB (11.01), I started off with 11.51, so if that experience is anything to go by you should be able to drop a lot of time with consistent training for a decent period of time.

    On the other hand, I also think you may need to learn not to tie your sense of purpose in life to how fast you are running. You are an intelligent young man with a desire to succeed and there is a lot more you can offer to this world than a low 11s 100m race.

    What you write about a dark cloud hanging over you and what sounds like a traumatic experience you had two years ago has me worried. Please make sure you get the help you need if you are suffering from some sort of emotional trauma or depression.

    I wish you all the best in all your endeavours, Robin.

  7. #67
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    Re: Update on my current training

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ue_3vCD4zGo

    So you can see how my start has changed from previously (just go to my channel on there "flash gambit" and look at my other videos)
    Though obviously from what I have been told, it still needs a lot of work.
    I apologize for the lack of frames, my friend who recorded me did it in a slow speed on his camera and it just came out like that.

    What seems to be a bigger issue though, is probably max v mechanics. I am super plantarflexed. (among other issues of course) I swear, the closest my heels get to touching the ground is like 3 inches away or so. I need to re-work everything. Any tips, advice, drills, recommendations, whatever, much appreciated.

    max v vid: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=33hr...ature=youtu.be

  8. #68

    Re: Update on my current training

    You are right, that is extreme plantarflexion which also seems to prevent you from extending your knee before and during ground contact. Are you doing B skips? Maybe try to focus on dorsiflexing (or just cocking the big toe up as Charlie used to say) before touchdown.

  9. #69

    Re: Update on my current training

    You have fixed the heel recovery for your start which is good to see. When you go into your start position your hips ascend into a good position but then go back down into a hunched position. Just stay at the top. Also, your back foot needs to press against the block. You are only touching the block with the ball of your left foot, which means your heel has to travel back before it can push against the block when you start moving. Finally, your right arm is moving to the back/side instead of forwards as you push out of the blocks.

  10. #70

    Re: Update on my current training

    Quote Originally Posted by kwave View Post
    When you say that you reverse the conversion of IIb/x to IIa through maintenance in weights and sub-max on the track, does it mean your IIb/x fibers that turned into IIa will turn into IIb/x fibers again?? I thought it requires complete rest in order for reverse-conversion to occur. Does just going into a sort of peaking/maintenance schedule actually turn your fibers into IIb/x again, resulting in greater speed? Is this one of the ways in which peaking does occur? (in addition to refreshing of the CNS and optimization of muscle tones) How long of peaking/maintenance period is needed to see such reverse-conversion?

    Thank you.
    This is very interesting to me and I'm just now seeing the science behind this.
    http://jap.physiology.org/content/74/2/911
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2FBF00572189

    What does this mean for us?
    How do we take advantage of this?

    This effect may have some bearing on my recently-completed season. I opened with an 11.5, followed it up with an 11.6, and then finished with two 11.8s.
    Why? Well I noticed more than anything a precipitous drop in speed endurance and a slight drop in max velocity. Probably because I spend most of the competition phase training with volumes similar to those used in my SPP! And a lot of that was heavy 110s and 120s! Flying in the face of everything I learned from CF's material (as mentioned by lkh).

    This was after a very productive GPP and SPP, wherein we all did some impressive things (at least for us): in our ten meter test (taken from HQ slow mo video, several angles), one of my guys hit 0.91, I hit 0.98 - both bests for us which would project us to PRs early in the season.

    So I ----- and my group ---- all noticed a regression during the season, instead of improvements. And I suppose the culprit is that we did not allow our gains to "set in" and kept pushing well beyond the stopping point.

    This is all to say: Brett, these guys are giving great advice. You're young and have a long time left to PR; I PR'd electronically at age 29 last year and expect to do so again next year at 31. And Robin1 is right about seeking help if you need it.

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