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Thread: Spp2 se

  1. #11
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    Re: Spp2 se

    Quote Originally Posted by Flash View Post
    Short-to-Long can take two basic forms. One is to simply start with just short distances and add longer distances as you progress through the phases. I think this is what most people think of when they think short-to-long.

    The other method approaches maximum speed from both directions, starting with short speed runs as well as long SE with short accelerations (maybe beginning as split runs), and then increasing the length of the speed runs while reducing the length of the SE runs. With this approach, the acceleration distances continually increase for both speed and SE (SE slightly lagging behind) until they arrive at close to the same point (e.g., 60-120m).

    Short-to-long primarily refers to the acceleration distance and not necessarily the total length of the run. That's why Charlie said the difference between short-to-long and long-to-short is not as dramatic as many people tend to think.
    Well said mate.

    The two major differences I can think of except length of the covered distance is the single rep, are form of sprinting and physiological response to the given stimulus.
    I think that, for any sport training CF philosophy/ thinking would apply well “Practice doesn’t make perfect. Practice makes permanent. Only perfect practice will make perfect!”
    Last edited by wermouth; 12-11-2014 at 06:10 PM.

  2. #12
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    Re: Spp2 se

    Quote Originally Posted by Flash View Post
    Short-to-Long can take two basic forms. One is to simply start with just short distances and add longer distances as you progress through the phases. I think this is what most people think of when they think short-to-long.

    The other method approaches maximum speed from both directions, starting with short speed runs as well as long SE with short accelerations (maybe beginning as split runs), and then increasing the length of the speed runs while reducing the length of the SE runs. With this approach, the acceleration distances continually increase for both speed and SE (SE slightly lagging behind) until they arrive at close to the same point (e.g., 60-120m).

    Short-to-long primarily refers to the acceleration distance and not necessarily the total length of the run. That's why Charlie said the difference between short-to-long and long-to-short is not as dramatic as many people tend to think.
    That's such a great way to look at it, going by average velocities and working them down with SE. I've thought about doing a hybrid method like that before, just not sure how to periodize it for a full phase.

  3. #13
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    Re: Spp2 se

    This is merely a simple example model:

    Phase 1 would start with 60m split runs and 60m speed change drills (EFE and FEF). The split runs form an early SE base and gradually morph into max speed runs as the intensity limit increases and the rest intervals and rep number decrease. At the same time, the speed change drills also morph into straight max speed runs (Charlie outlines this in several seminar videos). Eventually both workouts arrived at 60m max speed runs (from different directions), culminating in indoor comp.

    Phase 2 would continue to consolidate maximum speed training with longer max speed runs (50-80m) and flying sprints with long lead-ins (40-50E+20F) in the early parts of the phase, as well as incorporate longer SE runs, perhaps first as split runs and then morphing into longer SE runs as outlined above.

    Phase 3 would maintain the max speed and progress the SE to the shorter (and faster) 80-150m zone with max acceleration and recovery (not necessarily every SE workout, depending on recovery status).

  4. #14
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    Re: Spp2 se

    Quote Originally Posted by Flash View Post

    Phase 2 would continue to... incorporate longer SE runs, perhaps first as split runs and then morphing into longer SE runs as outlined above.

    Phase 3 would maintain the max speed and progress the SE to the shorter (and faster) 80-150m zone with max acceleration and recovery (not necessarily every SE workout, depending on recovery status).

    Not sure about what you mean here about SE though.... So you progress from split 60s to say, split 80s, then you can progress those as longer SE runs as discussed...

    But then, in phase 3, you maintain the max speed of course, and progress to SHORTER SE? After you lengthened them? Is that a typo or am I misunderstanding?

  5. #15
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    Re: Spp2 se

    In Phase 1, the 60s start off with a short intensity limit (20m) and rather short rest intervals. As such, they are run with incomplete recovery. You might begin with sets of 4x60m (20+) (i.e. 240m broken into four segments). As the intensity limit increases (25, 30, etc.), the rest intervals have to be increased and the number of reps and sets reduced, until you're running a few (e.g., 4-6) 60s all out by the end.

    You could potentially increase the length of the split runs while maintaining the intensity limit depending on how much speed work you would be doing at the end of Phase 1. For example, if you were doing split run 60s on M and F, and speed change drills on W, you are beginning with two SE workouts and 1 speed workout per week. However, as both types of workouts progress toward the same point (all out 60m runs) you end up with three max speed workouts per week. That might be too much to handle. It depends on the individual, how long the phase and comp period is, tapering, etc. (i.e. things that can't be answered easily in a forum). In that case, it might make sense to progress one of the split run workouts in the opposite direction by keeping the intensity limit and stretching the maintain portion of the runs so that at the end of the phase you are doing two max speed workouts and one SE workout per week.

    What I suggested for Phase 3 follows what I described in previous posts. In phase 2 you're using longer split runs (2-4x80-120m) and progressing them to longer continuous runs (250-300m) while continuing to hold the intensity limit at 20-30m. In Phase 3 you drop the distance of the SE runs but increase the acceleration distance, so that you're doing 80-150m runs with all out acceleration (no restrictor plate).

    Does that make more sense?

  6. #16
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    Re: Spp2 se

    Gotcha Flash.

  7. #17

    Re: Spp2 se

    This has been a great thread, however , I am confused a bit about the transition from spp1 to spp2. If in spp1 by the end you have built up the intensity limit to a few all out 60m runs, then in spp2 you do the 2x 3x 80m runs with an intensity limit of 20+, doesn't that waist the speed you have already developed in spp1 as you have done all out 60s. Just a little confused about this and how you would progress it. Cheers

  8. #18
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    Re: Spp2 se

    Again, remember that special endurance is a separate component from max speed, even though they are closely related. The intensity limits in the example SE progression for Phase 2 would not be applied to the max speed workouts.

  9. #19

    Re: Spp2 se

    Thanks flash, you've been a big help on this thread. Cheers

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