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Thread: Electric Muscle Stim Article by Charlie Francis

  1. #11

    Re: Electric Muscle Stim Article by Charlie Francis

    Can I have much infos about this kind of stim (speedcoach)????

    Thank you Ange...

  2. #12
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    Re: Electric Muscle Stim Article by Charlie Francis

    I have found this site about SpeedCoach if you interested http://speedendurance.com/store/spee...e-stimulation/
    Last edited by neseinc; 02-24-2012 at 09:20 AM.

  3. #13

    Re: Electric Muscle Stim Article by Charlie Francis

    Quote Originally Posted by gciriani View Post
    Very interesting article, because it goes through so many concepts. Thank you for posting it. Can you reference the publishing date or when it was actually written by Charlie?

    I believe it was originally posted on t-nation.com

  4. #14
    Member gciriani's Avatar
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    Re: Electric Muscle Stim Article by Charlie Francis

    Quote Originally Posted by jamirok View Post
    Can I have info about this speedcoach?...
    Number Two (aka Derek) and I developed the new programs. The impetus came from Number Two who believes that there are many things lacking in the stim units currently available, particularly for application to high performance sports. He and I reviewed the literature of the last couple of years on EMS research. We poured through many articles, several coming from the ISEK 2010, The XVIII Congress of the International Society of Electrophysiology and Kinesiology, which had a section dedicated to: Electrical stimulation for testing and training in exercise and sports. This knowledge was bootstrapped to the library of close to 1000 programs that Globus has built in its machines in the course of several years.

    Number Two has an interesting review of a very recent article:
    Girold S, Jalab C, Bernard O, et al. Dry-land strength training vs. electrical stimulation in sprint swimming performance. J Strength Cond Res. 2012;26(2):497–505.

    This article seems to confirm the direction we have undertaken. In his words:
    Based on my experience, EMS works effectively at improving strength and enhancing recovery.

  5. #15
    Member gciriani's Avatar
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    Re: Electric Muscle Stim Article by Charlie Francis

    It just occurred to me that Charlie's article is mostly about force building, but this thread is in the Recovery and regeneration section. This is probably the most common misconception about EMS: it is commonly thought of a rehab tool, that few people use for strength. It should instead be the other way around: it is a strength tool that some can also use for rehab.

  6. #16
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    Re: Electric Muscle Stim Article by Charlie Francis

    Quote Originally Posted by Angela Coon View Post
    I had a lot of issues with my feet after I had my son. The chemicals released when a woman gets pregnant effect the muscle tone in the feet and loosen the tendons in the feet as well as every where else. This is why many woman go up in shoe size post child. .
    A very vital Fact that every Coach and P.T. that trains females should know - but few do.
    It's at it's highest levels for 2 or so months, and trace amounts for up to 2yrs later!
    Naturally it's at its peak level during actual Birth

  7. #17
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    Re: Electric Muscle Stim Article by Charlie Francis

    Quote Originally Posted by gciriani View Post
    It just occurred to me that Charlie's article is mostly about force building, but this thread is in the Recovery and regeneration section. This is probably the most common misconception about EMS: it is commonly thought of a rehab tool, that few people use for strength. It should instead be the other way around: it is a strength tool that some can also use for rehab.
    The back of the " Charlie Francis Training System" is an entire chapter Charlie wrote via the interview he had with Paul Patterson for the Coaching Association of Canada Project pre 1988. Charlie never was interested in this manual which was something he never had time to do but decided differently post 1988 of September.
    In the manual Charlie discusses the use of EMS in sport, Immediate Post Injury Applications of EMS, Why EMS - Training of Speed is interesting ( ie = ems preferentially contracts white fibre before red ...., which is opposite the natural recruitment order of the body..., Charlie goes on to talk about EMS in training Hamstrings/ Ankle and Abdominal Strength and discusses Planning and Periodization of EMS into a Modern Training Program.
    Anyone wanting to use EMS for feet might also be interested in this section as he talks about stepping on the pads while in use as to prevent cramping.

  8. #18
    Member gciriani's Avatar
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    Re: Electric Muscle Stim Article by Charlie Francis

    Quote Originally Posted by Angela Coon View Post
    ... ems preferentially contracts white fiber before red ...
    This actually has been disproved by recent research, which suggests that EMS recruitment is not selective. However, the fact remains that EMS recruitment of muscle fibers is different than voluntary-training, muscle-fiber recruitment. Therefore this difference can be harnessed for particular training goals.

  9. #19
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    Re: Electric Muscle Stim Article by Charlie Francis

    Quote Originally Posted by gciriani View Post
    This actually has been disproved by recent research, which suggests that EMS recruitment is not selective. However, the fact remains that EMS recruitment of muscle fibers is different than voluntary-training, muscle-fiber recruitment. Therefore this difference can be harnessed for particular training goals.
    Is it possible for you to let us know which study / studies suggested that EMS fibre recruitment is not selective?

  10. #20
    Member gciriani's Avatar
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    Re: Electric Muscle Stim Article by Charlie Francis

    Quote Originally Posted by T-Slow View Post
    ... which ... studies suggested that EMS fibre recruitment is not selective?
    I gave a few quotations 3 years ago in this forum at the thread EMS Theory.

    Since then, the following paper summarizes the situation, and I will quote from it a passage that is relevant for this forum:
    Maffiuletti* NA. Physiological and methodological considerations for the use of neuromuscular electrical stimulation. Eur. J. Appl. Physiol. 2010;110(2):223–234.
    In an excellent review paper, Gregory and Bickel (2005) suggested that motor unit recruitment during NMES is nonselective or random (see also Jubeau et al. 2007); that is motor units are activated without obvious sequencing related to unit types (i.e., ‘‘disorderly’’ recruitment). This implies that NMES can activate some fast motor units, in addition to slow units, even at relatively low force levels. Indirect evidence suggests that the relative proportion of fast and slow motor units in a muscle activated by NMES at different force levels would be quite constant, as twitch contractile speeds were not found to differ between NMES training intensities of 20, 40 and 80% of MVC (Binder-Macleod et al. 1995). Such peculiarity of NMES recruitment inevitably entails some disadvantages (e.g., onset and extent of muscle fatigue, see below) but also several advantages, particularly for impaired muscles. For example, elderly individuals and patients presenting a selective atrophy of type II muscle fibers (e.g., chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, chronic steroid myopathy) (Gosker et al. 2002; Kanda et al. 2001), or orthopedic patients who cannot perform high-intensity voluntary contractions because of injury, recent surgery or impaired activation (Petterson and Snyder-Mackler 2006; Stevens et al. 2004), and also athletes requiring high levels of muscle strength and power (Babault et al. 2007; Delitto et al. 1989; Malatesta et al. 2003), would benefit from the use of NMES exercise—even at low intensity—to (re)train at least some of the fast fibers that otherwise can only be activated using high-force voluntary efforts. The main consequence of such a unique motor unit recruitment pattern for NMES is the exaggerated metabolic cost of an electrically evoked contraction (Vanderthommen et al. 2003), which, compared to a voluntary action of the same intensity, provokes greater and earlier muscle fatigue (Deley et al. 2006; Jubeau et al. 2008; Theurel et al. 2007). According to Vanderthommen and Duchateau (2007), these differences, in motor unit recruitment and thus in metabolic demand between NMES and voluntary contractions, constitute an argument in favor of the non-concomitant combination of these two techniques in the context of muscle (re)training. Differences in spatial recruitment between these two activation modalities, would also contribute, at least in part, to the significant muscle damage produced by NMES but not by voluntary isometric contractions of the same intensity (Jubeau et al. 2008).
    Note*:
    I consider Maffiuletti the author of the article one of the most knowledgeable scientists in the field of EMS for sport. You can see for yourself how often his name appears in the bibliography I keep in my web site.

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