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Thread: Motor Unit Recruitment in Resistance Exercises

  1. #21
    Senior Member
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    What is your level?

    Just curious as to training age or how many years you have been exposing your body to powerlifting? I think it would be very relevant to your scheduling. I have friends who are worldclass deadlifters from USAPL. They are life time drug free guys and both deadlift 750+ at 220lbs and 198 lbs. They started to reduce exposure to deadlifting every 10-14 days due to the amount of neural fatigue they were creating. I think perhaps moving deadlifts to your Max E may produce some positive results that could carry over to driving your squat up. Much of this depends on staying healthy. I know any time I go over 600 lbs, my back pays a price. I can do 545 lbs for 8, but 615 puts my back out for weeks. I would give it a shot and see what the result is. Perhaps using the method you outline could provide you with a new stimulus to drive MUA forward in your squat as a result of your improving deadlift prowess.

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by bobsanchez4321 View Post
    This thread has me re-thinking my powerlifting training program/schedule. I have always cared the most about squat, so I squat hard and heavy on Monday...when I am the freshest. I train legs twice a week, but I can't go heavy twice. So I squat heavy Monday, and do speed deadlifts on Thursday...8x3 w/ roughly 50%. In the past I have noticed significant and drastic benefits following squat workouts where I focused on speed with lighter than usual weights. Watching Pat Mendes squat 800 ATG with no belt, spotter, or safety catches made me believe that squatting fast is the best way. If squatting fast is so effective, and deadlifts train the highest level of MU recruitment, it would only make sense for me to reverse my schedule, training deadlifts hard and heavy on Monday....a sort of Max Effort Day, and a speed/dynamic squat day on thursday. Thoughts?
    You will usually notice a pop after going lighter, even if its for a single workout. Harnessing this phenomenom is the reason lifters cycle or wave their loads.

    As far as recruiting more CNS or having a higher overall MU doesn't mean deadlift is a better exercise. It depends on your goals. If posterior chain strength or mass, or short acceleration improvment is your goal, I definitely feel the squat is a better lift than the deadlift. Furthermore, I don't see the benefit of recruiting more MU overall in the body is a benefit. The idea is to recruit more MU at any one time in a specific muscle or group of related muscles. There's a big difference.

  3. #23
    Senior Member
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    I think that

    is the definition of MUA. Obviously people try to make their body more efficient in MUA. The more MUA, the more force production. I wouldn't say either exercise is superior to the other; it depends on what you are looking for. For someone like Bob Sanchez, who is talking in powerlifting parameters, I think it would be impossible to say either is more important than the other. Personally, I do cycles of deadlifts for 4 or so weeks for every 12 weeks squatting. I like to give my guys a mental break from the rigors of squatting. 4 weeks of deadlifting is often a welcome break and they get a serious jump in their poiundages over the course of a month. They get up into heavy 3-4 reps as I don't really care for max singles as I feel it's too dangerous to lower backs for football athletes.

  4. #24
    I'm 21 years old, and I ran track my entire life. I lifted weights since I was 15 but did not technically start powerlifting until one year ago. I did, however, perform all three 'power lifts' heavy throughout my running career so I've been lifting heavy for probably about 5 or 6 years.

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