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Thread: Ideas for a DIY Skeleton Rail Sled

  1. #11
    Moderator glaeser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ku2u#1 View Post
    Christopher, I think that I could probably do without hopping on the sled actually. It would be hard to slow down by going downhill with the sled, but I think I could probably just stand up and try to decelerate as much as possible. Sure it wouldn't be as legit, but if this was the best access to sled pushing that I had, then I'd be fine with it.
    Hi Kyle!

    I'm confident you could build an easy gliding run-along sled for very modest funds. To stop the sled after you let go, one possible solution is a 10 pound weight and a length of rope. Place the weight in the middle of the rails half way down the slope. As you pass over the weight, the sled will run out of rope and begin dragging the weight as it slows.

    If you use PVC rails, you could set them up for a modest number of days, and then break them down for storage.

    Anyway, just some ideas to kick around. I'm sure others with suggest improvements or alternatives.

    Best,
    Christopher

  2. #12
    Ku, you can make up whatever reason or excuse you want but the fact is if you aren't competitive over 30-60m you have no chance of pushing that sled fast. Who cares if people slower than you push the sled faster. Of the top 3 skeleton athletes, how many would you say are in the top 5 for speed among skeleton athletes? My point is to be productive and spend your time becoming a faster athlete who has a chance to make the team. Pushing the sled marginally faster isn't going to help if someone else runs two tenths or more faster over short distances.

    And toscoff off the 60m distance is beyond silly. Talk to your guy Beat Hefti to see whether or not it has a significant relationship.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by shaman View Post
    Ku, you can make up whatever reason or excuse you want but the fact is if you aren't competitive over 30-60m you have no chance of pushing that sled fast. Who cares if people slower than you push the sled faster. Of the top 3 skeleton athletes, how many would you say are in the top 5 for speed among skeleton athletes? My point is to be productive and spend your time becoming a faster athlete who has a chance to make the team. Pushing the sled marginally faster isn't going to help if someone else runs two tenths or more faster over short distances.

    And toscoff off the 60m distance is beyond silly. Talk to your guy Beat Hefti to see whether or not it has a significant relationship.
    1. Regarding your last comment: Comparing bobsled athletes to skeleton athletes is like comparing apples to oranges. Another huge factor that I haven't yet mentioned is that you do have to drive your own sled. This is the most difficult part of the sport. In bobsled, you have your own pilot that will take care of that for you. It becomes an even greater necessity to become the biggest, fastest, and strongest for bobsled. Regarding the push aspect of bobsled and skeleton, take a look at the posture of pushing the sled downhill on skeleton compared to bobsled. Going downhill overspeed in a crouched position without seeing whats in front of you isn't the same as running in a lot more upright position downhill and seeing how far you have before you get to hop inside of the sled. When I was up there, I heard from many top bobsledders that the two sports are very different and that they wouldn't want to bother learning how to drive a skeleton sled

    2. I'm not making an excuse, nor have I EVER made an excuse not to get faster for this sport. I already have been busting my ass for a long time in order to do well for this sport and I will never stop and you are correct in saying that I still need to keep busting my ass in getting faster. What I'm saying that its a reality that I have to face that I will always be at a disadvantage to those who have access to the push track up in Parks city and Lake Placid. Coming into the push champs, I was thinking that I would have a pretty good chance at doing well because of my speed and how well I ranked in the combine (as well as my bodytype). It did not turn out that way for me even and the absolute fastest guy (3.55) who had just a little more pushing experience than I did. I could only dream of skeleton being a sport like bobsled where the fastest and the strongest could win.

  4. #14
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    The biodynamic structure of the start mechanics is one in which the amplitude of movement is significantly different than dry land sprinting from a low start.

    In the skeleton start there is no opportunity for complete extension due to the athlete maintaining hold of the sled. This creates an even more quadriceps dominant regime of muscle work than in the dry land sprint start and early acceleration.

    As for increasing the speed of the skeleton start, the same rules still apply in principle:
    - one must train near top speed for that distance in order to improve top speed for that distance

    This is where the similarities end, however; due to the fact the athlete is restricted to keeping their hands close to the level of the sprint surface and the degree of resistance one must overcome is far in excess of bodyweight.

    It is my contention that dry land sprint work be used in the GPP and begin to yield towards dry land or ice (if able) pushes in the SPP

    FIBT indicates that the male sled weighs 43kg with a combined allowance with bodyweight of 115kg.

    Aside from making a dry land sled set up as Glaeser has shown, another option are sled or low handle Prowler pushes. Sprint sleds come in various dimensions/weights, the econo Prowler weighs 65lbs, and the regular Prowler weighs 75lbs. Adjusting load is easy enough by using weight plates for an overspeed, comparable, or overloaded effect.

    While I haven't pushed a skeleton sled, I am able to attest to the fact that asphalt, not concrete, makes for a quick surface on which to push a sled or prowler that may very well prove useful for a skeleton athlete.

  5. #15
    Moderator glaeser's Avatar
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    Add a Skeleton Simulator to your holiday wish list.

    http://www.materialise.com/materiali...terialise.html

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