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Thread: Squats

  1. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobsanchez4321 View Post
    I am 6 feet tall. In high school i weighed around 190 at about 5%...now I am 230 and maybe 8%. I was a hurdler in high school, and maybe this is why my maxV was never really developed....Because I only got 15 yards to accelarate before I had to get into a hurdle rhythm, and maybe that is why I never learned how to run efficiently at top speed. i ran 14.60 FAT, and that was my PR from my injury riddled senior season.


    Would the concept of competing resources apply to sprint hurdle training vs. sprint training? For example...If too much energy is spent working over the hurdles in practice, would it not leave enough resources to develop speed on the flat? I ask because when I ran track I never ran sprints on the flat. Only flat running was 300's in high school and in college practice besides warming up i only ran when i was going over hurdles
    What is funny is I was going to be playing runningback this fall for my school until I had issues with my grades. And I've recently been considering taking up bobsledding.
    You said that you gave a seminar in Mobile. Will you be giving anymore seminars in the southeast anytime soon?
    Any high cns stress can compete with any other if dosages are out of order.

    Can too much hurdle practice impede the speed development of a hurdler, answer- absolutely; however, each situation is unique.

    As for speaking engagements in the southeast, nothing is scheduled right now.

  2. #72
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    To be fair, it is prudent to refer to any effort beneath 100% as sub-maximal. As to where we draw the line between different intensity zones, this is when the situation becomes context dependent due to differences in the biodynamic structure of various maneuvers.

  3. #73
    Quote Originally Posted by James Smith View Post
    Any high cns stress can compete with any other if dosages are out of order.

    Can too much hurdle practice impede the speed development of a hurdler, answer- absolutely; however, each situation is unique.

    As for speaking engagements in the southeast, nothing is scheduled right now.
    In that case it's a miracle I could even sprint as well as I did, because the volume of hurdle work I was doing was absurd back then. Leaving no resources for the speed work I wasn't doing...haha.
    Thanks for answering my questions. I am always trying to learn more about the science behind athletics and training

  4. #74
    Quote Originally Posted by RB34 View Post
    My verison of a athletic strength block - still submax......

    3x5x75
    3x5x80
    3x5x82-83
    I believe you mentioned Stone. Stone considers Maximal Strength to be characterized by one of the following sessions...

    15-25 reps/session @95-100%
    20-40 reps/session @ 90-95%
    35-85 reps/session @ 75-80%

    During the actual bread and butter max strength phases of his periodization plans, there is a lot (>15%) of all reps in the >85% range.

    RB, your rep ranges are a little high for my taste, and the loads a little low, for what I like in a true max strength phase. I like the following sessions (talking about a pure max strength phase here without reference to competing CNS resources)...

    5 x 5 @ 80% (about an 8RM load)
    4 x 4 @ 85% (about a 6RM load)
    3 x 3 @ 87.5-90% (about an 4-5RM load)
    4 x 2 @ 90-92.5% (about a 3-4RM load)
    ? x 1 @ 95-100% (max)

    I actually don't believe in calculating a load, because every session in the gym is unique. I like to lift heavy with only a rep or two left in the tank whether its a hypertrophy set (6-10 reps) or a pure stength set (1-5 reps).


    Quote Originally Posted by RB34 View Post
    ... I asked earlier for everyone to define submax weights/loads.
    The boundaries are vague, but normally when I read/hear most people talking about near maximal, sub maximal etc., it seems to fall into the following broad, unofficial categories (the boundaries are fuzzy, I admit)...


    <75% low load - (hypertrophy, explosive strength or strength endurance depending on rep range and tempo)
    <75-85% - Sub-maximal (moderate intensity, hypertrophy and strength depending on rep range)
    85-95% - Near-maximal high intensity (high intensity, strength and some hypertrophy)
    >95% - Maximal (very high intensity, purely strength, little hypertrophy)

  5. #75
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    You may have seen some of Dr. Stone' weightlifting/throwing cycles, his sprint cycles are more conservative. The example I gave above is a older block I used with a athlete in the past - it's my version of submax work for the speed-power athlete. Your examples are too aggressive for my taste - aka too much for the speed-power athlete.

    Quote Originally Posted by star61 View Post
    I believe you mentioned Stone. Stone considers Maximal Strength to be characterized by one of the following sessions...

    15-25 reps/session @95-100%
    20-40 reps/session @ 90-95%
    35-85 reps/session @ 75-80%

    During the actual bread and butter max strength phases of his periodization plans, there is a lot (>15%) of all reps in the >85% range.

    RB, your rep ranges are a little high for my taste, and the loads a little low, for what I like in a true max strength phase. I like the following sessions (talking about a pure max strength phase here without reference to competing CNS resources)...

    5 x 5 @ 80% (about an 8RM load)
    4 x 4 @ 85% (about a 6RM load)
    3 x 3 @ 87.5-90% (about an 4-5RM load)
    4 x 2 @ 90-92.5% (about a 3-4RM load)
    ? x 1 @ 95-100% (max)

    I actually don't believe in calculating a load, because every session in the gym is unique. I like to lift heavy with only a rep or two left in the tank whether its a hypertrophy set (6-10 reps) or a pure stength set (1-5 reps).



    The boundaries are vague, but normally when I read/hear most people talking about near maximal, sub maximal etc., it seems to fall into the following broad, unofficial categories (the boundaries are fuzzy, I admit)...


    <75% low load - (hypertrophy, explosive strength or strength endurance depending on rep range and tempo)
    <75-85% - Sub-maximal (moderate intensity, hypertrophy and strength depending on rep range)
    85-95% - Near-maximal high intensity (high intensity, strength and some hypertrophy)
    >95% - Maximal (very high intensity, purely strength, little hypertrophy)

  6. #76
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    The vast majority of Stone's program I've seen are done for %'s of set-rep maxes. That is, the %'s are from the maximum of whatever sets and reps you are doing and NOT from a 1rm.

    I have only seen two of his programs that used a 1rm. One from 2007 and one from the early 90's and they were used for athletes who had only known at that time 1rm's and not what their set-rep bests were. The one from the early 90's was used in a presentation on programming he gave and the one from 2007 was for incoming freshmen at ETSU who had little experience using a set-rep best (maximum for sets and reps) system.

    So, if someone is doing working at a moderate load (for him this means 80-85%) for 3 x 10 or 3 x 5 or 3 x 3 that means the percentage is 80-85% of the most weight that individual can lift for that specific exercise for 3 x 10 or the other examples and not a percentage of their 1rm.

  7. #77
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    I hope my post wasn't misleading - I wasn't trying to say Dr. Stone used 1rm etc. Thanks for making my point about Dr. Stone loading patterns - the loading/volume patterns "star" mention above is new to me. That's a very important point about the set-rep maxes - they must be accurate otherwise it could be trouble - either too heavy or too light.


    Quote Originally Posted by Pioneer View Post
    The vast majority of Stone's program I've seen are done for %'s of set-rep maxes. That is, the %'s are from the maximum of whatever sets and reps you are doing and NOT from a 1rm.

    I have only seen two of his programs that used a 1rm. One from 2007 and one from the early 90's and they were used for athletes who had knew at that time knew their 1rm's and not their set-rep best were. The one from the early 90's was used in presentation on programming he gave and the one from 2007 was for incoming freshmen at ETSU who had little experience using a set-rep best (maximum for sets and reps) system.

    So, if someone is doing working at a moderate load (for him this means 80-85%) for 3 x 10 or 3 x 5 or 3 x 3 that means the percentage is 80-85% of the most weight that individual can lift for that specific exercise for 3 x 10 or the other examples and not a percentage of their 1rm.

  8. #78

  9. #79
    Quote Originally Posted by Pioneer View Post
    The vast majority of Stone's program I've seen are done for %'s of set-rep maxes. That is, the %'s are from the maximum of whatever sets and reps you are doing and NOT from a 1rm.

    I have only seen two of his programs that used a 1rm. One from 2007 and one from the early 90's and they were used for athletes who had only known at that time 1rm's and not what their set-rep bests were. The one from the early 90's was used in a presentation on programming he gave and the one from 2007 was for incoming freshmen at ETSU who had little experience using a set-rep best (maximum for sets and reps) system.

    So, if someone is doing working at a moderate load (for him this means 80-85%) for 3 x 10 or 3 x 5 or 3 x 3 that means the percentage is 80-85% of the most weight that individual can lift for that specific exercise for 3 x 10 or the other examples and not a percentage of their 1rm.
    I'm referencing Stone's piece on weightlifting periodization...

    Weightlifting: Program Design
    National Strength and Conditioning Association
    Volume 28, Number 2, pages 10-17


    Without question, these numbers are based off of 1RM. There is a bodybuilding cycle followed by strength cycles with loads up to 93%, with half of the heavy days over 85%. Even when you factor in a light day, there are a lot of reps of higher intensity.

  10. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by John View Post
    All I see here and in the latest above discussion is just another series of largely over-estimated stimuli-based constructs which assume our systems respond in a similar linear manner. Which is only a vast assumption.But the large majority of today's training at all levels is founded upon (erroneous,when not plainly wrong) assumptions in the end.

    Prilepin's table gives an indication: you may take it,use it as a guideline,observe the direction your training is going,evaluate responses more than stimuli,and eventually take all information as guidelines and general directions,not as answers to the questions rising in minds puzzled by such a training scenario as the one described above.

    The more we get into specific (purely artificial) constructs such as the above dissertation the more puzzled we are doomed to be.
    We can surely always have fun,play with numbers,and words though.

    Also the aim of Soviet literature (where Prilepin's table emerges from) about training and sport was often to evoke productive discussion leading to further possible theoretical developments and theory applications,resulting in very dynamic principles,and never in words carved in stone.
    Read through the "sport science" articles collected on James Smith's site and note how researchers would often engage in open debates through their publications. When time allows I always spend some time there. The wording and phrasing gives me a good laugh too.
    Knowledge belongs to the world. (Synapse)

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