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Thread: Pick One

  1. #11
    Member DMA's Avatar
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    Upper Body - Push Ups

    Legs - Hills and Sprinting
    Continuing to learn is one thing in life that has to continue.

  2. #12
    Upper body- Bench+pull ups
    Lower body-Sleds+fly's+squats

  3. #13
    T-slow is right, you have to consider your goals.

    What are you training for? A 40 yard dash? 100m? mile run? marathon?

    If its a 40 then its the squat hands down
    100m for at least a novice sprinter would be just sprinting
    the further the distance the less strength training needs to be involved IMO

  4. #14
    Member boldwarrior's Avatar
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    Beginners are the hardest to say, "just one" - A lot of beginners cant even do a proper push up, or chin up...
    Then you got to look at stability issues (not swiss balls or bosu though)

    Then there are tightness issues.

    Then you need to make sure, if you're doing Push ups or Benches, you do some back work also - or you get monkey shoulders....

    If you do plyro's without enough basic Strength work - you may run into problems.

    IF you don't do any plyros and too much weights - other issues arise.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by kelly clinevell View Post
    I wasnt suggesting just one was necessary I was just interested in hearing others opnions. I do not have that bundle yet. I do have Strength and Speed and the master set of ebooks. The reason I was curious is because I noticed what seemed to be a reliance on a few movements in those materials. I was also curious about what depth Charlie considered a half squat to be.
    half squat would be just about parallel

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by speedster12 View Post
    half squat would be just about parallel
    That's what people say but it's usually above parallel. I know there was a video posted before of ben's 600lb squat and it was a a good bit above parallel. In fact it seems the deeper people squat, the slower they are. Most top athletics guys are not squatting to textbook depths.

  7. #17
    Member John's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mortac8 View Post
    That's what people say but it's usually above parallel. I know there was a video posted before of ben's 600lb squat and it was a a good bit above parallel. In fact it seems the deeper people squat, the slower they are. Most top athletics guys are not squatting to textbook depths.
    2.42 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w-K5An8qf1Q

  8. #18
    Senior Member kitkat1's Avatar
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    Since all force must pass through the centre, get the core stablized and strong before you do much of anything else.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by mortac8 View Post
    In fact it seems the deeper people squat, the slower they are. Most top athletics guys are not squatting to textbook depths.
    yes!

    Risk vs Reward!

    they're playing with fire!!!

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by mortac8 View Post
    That's what people say but it's usually above parallel. I know there was a video posted before of ben's 600lb squat and it was a a good bit above parallel. In fact it seems the deeper people squat, the slower they are. Most top athletics guys are not squatting to textbook depths.
    It seems that the deep squat is more conducive to a good start. Evidence of this would be the oft quoted ability of olympic lifters having a better or equal start than olympic sprinters. I don't know if it's necessary to put your butt to your heels but it seems that parallel would come close to matching the joint angles present in the start.

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