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Thread: yoga

  1. #21
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    Originally posted by Druze
    Some more points against yoga.

    Why not save your money, and time, by stretching at home, then going to the beach to check out the girls
    On a more serious note, the money saved by not joining a yoga class could be put towards massage.

    D.
    Why not save money on massage and get your next door neigbour to do it for you? You could get them to walk up and down your back arse and calves and save a bucket of money each month.

    If something is worth doing, it's worth doing properly. If you can find a decent yoga instructor, not just some camp bloke who thinks he looks good in lycra, it will make all the difference. Stretching and core strengthening (both emphasized by yoga) require correct posture to get the most out of them and to avoid injury.

    As for hypermobility, TIM, you are talking theory out your arse. If an athlete is sprinting several times a week, performing volume running, lifting weights, a few yoga sessions a week is not going to cause a loss of elasticity or cause joints to become hypermobile. This is the equivelent of some one living in a bomb shelter on the off chance that a meteorite might flatten their house. The odds are similar.

  2. #22
    Dazed your talkin rubbish,

    Elighten me on how long it takes an athlete to become hypermobile. You have your definition of hypermobiliy all messed up like frasier's hair. Couldnt it happen in just a few sessions. It could happen in one. How long does a yoga session last. An hour. Sounds like fun. Lets go stretch our hammies for an hour straight then try and sprint the next day.I bet I could make you hypermobile in less then a week. And if you keep it up I will. Also my house got hit with a meteor last night.

    Go figure

  3. #23
    Also you can be doing ridiculous amounts of sprinting, lifting, ect ect. Be competly sore and still be hypermoblie. This is not specifically correlated with the factors that you mentioned above. You can be hypermobile and not even play a sport.

  4. #24
    Elighten me on how long it takes an athlete to become hypermobile. You have your definition of hypermobiliy all messed up like frasier's hair. Couldnt it happen in just a few sessions. It could happen in one. How long does a yoga session last. An hour. Sounds like fun. Lets go stretch our hammies for an hour straight then try and sprint the next day.I bet I could make you hypermobile in less then a week. And if you keep it up I will. Also my house got hit with a meteor last night.
    Timothy,
    i mean no disrespect here, but if you have never done REAL yoga then shut your mouth. yoga is extremely relaxing (already stated) and if you do it right, every movement flows effortlessly and you barely even feel a stretch.

    peace

  5. #25
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    Overly increased range of movement of joints causing joint laxity and instability.

    Is how I would define it, as opposed to your

    To much flexibility and not enough tightness.
    But I was seeking to address the fallacies in your statement which dealt primarily with reduction in muscle tonus. The actual definition referrs to a physical and semi-permenant change to the mobility of the joint, which causes it to lose stability, not as you have defined it as a very temporary physiological effect.

    On a side note if you stretched your hammies out for an hour the next day you would find that you would have the opposite effect to what you are suggesting. The muscles would be hypertonic due to muscle damage and golgi protection mechanisms seeking to stabilitze the joint from the over laxity which YOU tim are anticipating. Don't believe me? Take it up with Vladamir Janda.

    True hypermobility, unless it is disease of atrophy based, will take months if not years of flexability training day in day out - not a week, a day or an hour.

    Have you ever done yoga Tim? Do they focus on one pose the entire time? Or does your entire experience with yoga originate from some a commercial where some yogi is sitting in the lotus position or with his arse behind his ears for days at a time? Because your comparison between stretching your hammies for an hour to an hour of yoga couldnot be further from the truth. Most Yoga sessions involve a series of poses held for a short duration of time, (using gravity or opposing muscle groups to create the force necessary to perform the stretch) and many transitions. The fact that the opposing muscle groups are used to create the stretch actually go along way to PREVENT true hypermobility.

    Your second statement is completely rediculous and demonstrates, once again, that you don't understand the phenomena which you are referring to. Soreness never came into the equasion, what was being described was A) that muscle tonus is kept high - which inhibits the development of a structural increase in length of the muscle (B) the strengthening and shortening of connctive tissue as a result of high stresses.

    Sorry Tim but your definition is the one which needs revising - it may describe one facet that long term can contribute to hypermobility but not hypermobility itself.

  6. #26
    Clemson
    Guest
    Unless the instructor is doing some sort of voodoo, the athlete is in control of their own body. Stretch as far and long as you want. Christ...most of the instructors are vegetarians...not boot camp sargents.

  7. #27
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    Originally posted by Clemson
    Unless the instructor is doing some sort of voodoo, the athlete is in control of their own body. Stretch as far and long as you want. Christ...most of the instructors are vegetarians...not boot camp sargents.
    LOL I can't exactly see Moby as a Warrent Officer. This brings it back to an important point, a good instructor will keep classes smal and tailor a session to the athletes needs.

  8. #28
    Dazed points 1,2,3 are wrong again. My recommendation is conseling. First your telling charlie someone pulled his leg. Charlie who coached 23 world records. Now your arguing with the logic of the topic massage therapists in the country.

    You can be hypermobile in more ways then one. It is referring to individualized stretches and range of motion for each one of them. You can be hypermobile in one stretch and not the other. It tests the range of motion. Anyways go argue with the top massage therapists in the country and present your case to them and they will laugh. You are right dazed your defintion is infalliable. What else do you recommend. I dont need this today please. Joint damage or whatever you said is wrong and you know it. Take it up with doc I dont have time for this.

    Point golgi tendons keep your body from falling apart. So you wont break your bones or tendons when your lifting weight. A defense response. For you that would be 135 for bench press..

    Stretch your hamstring for a long time and you will have to much flexibility.

    The last point you thought there was a correlation between highwork load and hypermobility and you were wrong.

    My last point. Should a grown man be sporting pink undies. jk. Anyways go back to the books and check it up. Maybe ask vlandamir again.

    PS also seek the websters on the definition for scarcasim. Stretching for an hour a days come on now. Also there is a forum a highly reccoment you, playerhaters.com. You might wanna look into it.

  9. #29
    RE Hypermobility: a physical and semi-permenant change to the mobility of the joint, which causes it to lose stability. My career ending inury is of this nature. My big toe is hypermobile. And yes, this is the definition the experts will agree on. Otherwise things would become relative and nobody can agree on what the topic is.

    Tim, when someone tells me something about my religion that doesn't jive with me, I ask them..."Chapter and verse?" (as in where in the Bible did you get that from). Where are you getting your info from. Dazed has made his case quite sound, both with his experience and sources. I can say that someone is wrong all day, and even call them names, but without proof, I will go nowhere to win the arguement.

  10. #30
    Very simple answer. Hypermobility syndrome is different then hypermobility for athletes. My info comes from experts, and many hours of reading. Do I need to list them all .I will!

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