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Thread: 10/20 yd sprint times for softball

  1. #1

    10/20 yd sprint times for softball

    Anyone know what good 10 and 20 yd sprint times for collegiate softball players are?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
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    I assume you're talking women's softball. 1.71 sec. for 10yds. is the record at University of Nebraska.

    TNT

  3. #3
    Sort of fits to this topic...
    I struggle finding a good way to time these short sprint distances by hand (stopwatch), since I do not have access to better equipment.
    What would you recommend?
    -start on vocal cue
    -start watch when athletes starts first motion
    -start watch on first foot contact passed the line
    ????

    Thanks.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    226
    I find it difficult enough timing home to first. When doing that, I start from their first movement of anything (arm, foot) and stop when they touch the bag. The best way to do 10 yds. would be electronically (both start and stop).

    TNT

  5. #5
    I second TNT's response. 10 yards is such a short sprint distance that hand timing's errors are magnified greatly. Electronic is the only way to go here.

    On a further note, I have lots of discussions with our baseball/softball staffs regarding the necessity of a "home to first" timed test. When one counts the swing, it is difficult to make it realistic. Was the player off balance after their swing? The are lots of variables here....

    This fall, for baseball, we scrapped the home to first times for an electronic 90 foot/30 yard number. This way, all of the times are standardized....

  6. #6
    Not to be a spoiler, but going through the hassle of accurately timing a 10m sprint for a softball player is lost on me. No coach in his right mind would rank a softball player based on a tenth or two in a 10m sprint. Speed is important, but not nearly so much as game skills and game awareness.

    Training to improve speed is important, and a huge part of that is reaction time. Batters often hesitate for up to a full second after a big hit before deciding that they better get down the line. Time batters from the moment of impact (bat on ball) to first base. This will teach them to get out of the hole quicker and will improve home to first time more than any sprint program. Second, put a stopwatch on first to second, first to third etc. after a hit ball, again starting time on bat to ball impact. This will improve reaction time as well as working on sport specific sprinting. As far as timing goes, absolute accuracy is not that important. If you can get repeatable results (prescision) then you can monitor progress.

    Bottom line, I think the time spent by the athletes and coaches trying to time 10m sprints to the hundreth of a second is wasted time that could be better spent on skills and actual sprint training.

  7. #7
    Thanks for the replies. That's kind of what I thought for the 10 yd. I've been using electronic and thus far have seen improvments out of the girls since the start of the fall.

    I have emphasized more speed training with them all semester but for the majority it has been working on technique (starts) and getting stronger that I think really has made the difference.

  8. #8
    I think you can train all of those qualities. The athletes should first learn utilize their body effeciently from the start, so have them go on your call right away. Because softball/baseball is dependent on reaction times I even have them react to each other from the start. When we test I use electronic and begin from their first movement.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by mdan View Post
    Sort of fits to this topic...
    I struggle finding a good way to time these short sprint distances by hand (stopwatch), since I do not have access to better equipment.
    What would you recommend?
    -start on vocal cue
    -start watch when athletes starts first motion
    -start watch on first foot contact passed the line
    ????

    Thanks.
    I think you can train all of those qualities. The athletes should first learn utilize their body effeciently from the start, so have them go on your call right away. Because softball/baseball is dependent on reaction times I even have them react to each other from the start. When we test I use electronic and begin from their first movement.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by star61 View Post
    Not to be a spoiler, but going through the hassle of accurately timing a 10m sprint for a softball player is lost on me. No coach in his right mind would rank a softball player based on a tenth or two in a 10m sprint. Speed is important, but not nearly so much as game skills and game awareness.

    Training to improve speed is important, and a huge part of that is reaction time. Batters often hesitate for up to a full second after a big hit before deciding that they better get down the line. Time batters from the moment of impact (bat on ball) to first base. This will teach them to get out of the hole quicker and will improve home to first time more than any sprint program. Second, put a stopwatch on first to second, first to third etc. after a hit ball, again starting time on bat to ball impact. This will improve reaction time as well as working on sport specific sprinting. As far as timing goes, absolute accuracy is not that important. If you can get repeatable results (prescision) then you can monitor progress.

    Bottom line, I think the time spent by the athletes and coaches trying to time 10m sprints to the hundreth of a second is wasted time that could be better spent on skills and actual sprint training.
    Knowing where athletes are (baseline) and evaluating (testing) whether the program you are running is developing their athletic qualities is fundamental to a well planned program.

    These types of tests are best standardized away from the diamond and used as a measure of general acceleration improvement.

    I think the 30 yard is a much better test for softball athletes, as a 10 m would require a lot of specific skills in max strength and explosive power.

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