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Thread: America'$ Relay$ Debacle

  1. #11
    Administrator Charlie Francis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MSO View Post
    I have a question. Say you have a very, very good runner who is not the best in the country. He will be on the Olympic/Worlds relay team, but will not run anchor. Is he going to end up running anchor on most of the relays he runs prior to the Olympics/Worlds? If so, he may never hand off in competition until the Olympics/Worlds. Does this happen? And if so, does it matter?
    It can happen and it does matter. usually though, colleges do shift athletes around in training but at some point, the ability to pass in all positions with either hand becomes important.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Francis View Post
    An effective relay camp before competitions is a HUGE problem, because, as you probably know, the period before a major comp is the time to lower training intensity and especially to individualize the pre-comp period.
    Relay practices are usually fast affairs, once you get past fundamemtal stick passing drills which the vast majority of US athletes have mastered in college long before.
    The Texas Relays are held very early in the training schedule of Professional athletes vs College athletes so readiness is a big issue.
    Hosting/supporting relay comps in big meets after the sprint events is the way to go here. This requires some negotiations with meet directors. If the federation pays to bring in the athletes, the meet must reciprocate by eliminating heats in the 100, instead going straight to A and B finals to allow the athletes to be fresh enough to perform. Enough comps in major meets when the athletes are as ready as they can be will work well.
    I can dig it. Sounds like a great idea there are plenty of countries that are looking for a sanctioned relay meet to compete and this would solve that problem also.

    I said an effective camp in my previous post because obviously personal practices will have to be coordinated with the relay practices some way or the other. Sacrifice.

  3. #13
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    This is definitely not my department, but if athletes are worried about having too many races and such at meets, would 4x50 instead of 4x100 work for relays at meets, in order to get practice for eventual 4x100 relays?

    It seems to me that the big relay problem is not running-related, it's baton-related. This would give everyone the same hand-off practice, but with less running volume.

    I realize the hand-off points would be different and the curves would play out differently and that sort of thing, but it would still be a relay race. It would be sort of like 7 on 7 competitions in football. It's not the same as the full event, but an important part of the sport gets practiced in conditions that are somewhat similar to the full event.

    I know I'd watch.

  4. #14
    Administrator Charlie Francis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MSO View Post
    This is definitely not my department, but if athletes are worried about having too many races and such at meets, would 4x50 instead of 4x100 work for relays at meets, in order to get practice for eventual 4x100 relays?

    It seems to me that the big relay problem is not running-related, it's baton-related. This would give everyone the same hand-off practice, but with less running volume.

    I realize the hand-off points would be different and the curves would play out differently and that sort of thing, but it would still be a relay race. It would be sort of like 7 on 7 competitions in football. It's not the same as the full event, but an important part of the sport gets practiced in conditions that are somewhat similar to the full event.

    I know I'd watch.
    I'd watch only cause it'd be a train-wreck.
    The second exchange requires the full distance to generate the demands of the exchange. The incoming runner must enter the curve on the outside of the outgoing runner, and this disadvantage makes fatigue a huge issue if the pass isn't made cleanly at the first opportunity. The incoming runners at the first and third exchange can take advantage of their inner lane position to cut the distance to their teammate if they need a second chance.
    Bottom line: All exchanges require curve work at the appropriate spot.

  5. #15
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    Got it.

    Thanks.

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