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Thread: FEF vs. EFE

  1. #11
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    More often than not, the athletes say they are ready to go well before a full recovery has taken place. They think if they are not breathing hard and heavy then it's time to go again.

    Part of it is, I think, programmed into many athletes by other coaches who use suicides, etc. with little to no rest.

  2. #12
    Administrator Charlie Francis's Avatar
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    The cold can alter recovery times since you're unlikely to get up to the same speed level, lessening the need for recovery and you'll cool off sooner.

  3. #13
    I've found the same thing as Pioneer with my HS athletes. It took awhile for them to understand full rest.

    Another thing I've found is that classic sport conditioning, i.e. low rest intervals, programs athletes to never run full speed. So for sprinters I've had to gain their trust with longer rests and prove to them they can actually run full effort because they'll have adequate recovery.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Benny The Jet Rodriguez View Post
    Consensus was that the rest was very long (and I had already adjusted it somewhat). They all felt that they were ready to run full speed again after about 3 or 4 minutes and since the weather is starting to get cold they don't like to be standing around.
    I say that if the athlete feels ready to run, they are ready to run. No need to draw out the rest. Sprinters are lazy by nature. No need to make them lazier especially in the cold.
    Repeat after me: "my novice/intermediate athletes are not Ben or Tim"

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by mortac8 View Post
    I say that if the athlete feels ready to run, they are ready to run. No need to draw out the rest. Sprinters are lazy by nature. No need to make them lazier especially in the cold.
    Repeat after me: "my novice/intermediate athletes are not Ben or Tim"
    Yes I agree. But sometimes athletes have the mentality that they are always ready to go. And, Benny, you don't have to have them completely stationary during rest - some stretching, jogging, light calisthenics can still be used during rest periods to keep the body warmth, flexibility, and blood flow.

  6. #16
    I agree with all about athletes thinking they are ready to go before they actually should be. I've actually speed trapped some flying 20s at different rest lengths to make sure that wasn't the case. I think 8-9 minutes is a lot of rest for a flying 20 if you aren't running sub 7.2 60s(men) or sub 8.3 60s(women), and unfortunately my athletes aren't yet.

  7. #17
    What are the distances? 20-20-20 region? I find in this region that EFE you only reach a submax topspeed i.e. maybe 95% as you only accelerate easy for 20 then hard 20.
    During FEF over this distance most athletes can hit 100% top speed (maybe even 100%+ 100m speed!).
    So if following CF short-to-long wouldn't a higher EFE ratio early on tie in with using shorter accelerations to top-speed, and pushing the acc. farther out later - so more FEF...
    Am I on the right lines here??

  8. #18
    Administrator Charlie Francis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by UKcheetah View Post
    What are the distances? 20-20-20 region? I find in this region that EFE you only reach a submax topspeed i.e. maybe 95% as you only accelerate easy for 20 then hard 20.
    During FEF over this distance most athletes can hit 100% top speed (maybe even 100%+ 100m speed!).
    So if following CF short-to-long wouldn't a higher EFE ratio early on tie in with using shorter accelerations to top-speed, and pushing the acc. farther out later - so more FEF...
    Am I on the right lines here??
    With FEF, the speed you reach in the second burst depends how you enter the zone. If you slow down enough, you won't reach near max, if you you coast through the E part without slowing down much, you might reach top speed.
    The risk of entering the second zone too fast is that you might struggle to pick up speed. the key is relaxation. Check the GPP vid for examples of excellent form in all levels of speed from early GPP to late.

  9. #19
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    Here is a vid of one of my athletes doing both. I think he slowed down too much.

    http://www.viddler.com/explore/ESTI/videos/1/

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by ESTI View Post
    Here is a vid of one of my athletes doing both. I think he slowed down too much.

    http://www.viddler.com/explore/ESTI/videos/1/

    This is the reason why I dont like doing efe/fef/flying sprints with non-track guys or younger athletes.

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