Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Upper-lower body strength interactions

  1. #1

    Upper-lower body strength interactions

    Could an increase in upper body strength (eg.bench) possibly bring on an increase in lower body strength (eg squatting) , even if it comes with a bit of a "lag time" ? Have you noticed such a phenomenon?

  2. #2
    No, but I certainly can vouch for the opposite scenario!

  3. #3
    I guess every exercise has
    1. Central Component
    2. Local Component

    of adaptation. Thus, no matter what you do will transfer to everything else you do (due the central component). Anyway, this transfer depends on your level (strenght, speed, training age..) and exercise type. Sometime the transfer is negative. Due this factor (central effect), begginers do not need too much of specificity, but later they do.
    Maybe I am just *hitting here or maybe this makes sense... I haven't experience it in practice due the fact that I train whole body moslty in strength trainign sessions...

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by acidhell
    Could an increase in upper body strength (eg.bench) possibly bring on an increase in lower body strength (eg squatting) , even if it comes with a bit of a "lag time" ? Have you noticed such a phenomenon?
    I have experienced the opposite. I havenít squatted or deadlifted for 10 months, yet I still do a lot of upper body work. I found that my lower body strength levels did not drop off. I believe upper body strenght has some effect but speed work helps maintain lower body strength more then anything else.

  5. #5
    Administrator Charlie Francis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    10,477
    Quote Originally Posted by acidhell
    Could an increase in upper body strength (eg.bench) possibly bring on an increase in lower body strength (eg squatting) , even if it comes with a bit of a "lag time" ? Have you noticed such a phenomenon?
    Yes. we've discussed this in hte general strength threads and in the forum reviews under general organism strength. This is part of why we do it.

  6. #6
    Member pakewi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Milan,Italy
    Posts
    887
    Quote Originally Posted by acidhell
    Could an increase in upper body strength (eg.bench) possibly bring on an increase in lower body strength (eg squatting) , even if it comes with a bit of a "lag time" ? Have you noticed such a phenomenon?
    Where EVERY phenomenon starts and ends in us humans? In the BRAIN.Do we have an "upper body" brain and a"lower body" brain? We all have just one!

    The "lag time" you notice is due to factors which interfere with the proper neurological wiring and patterning.Remove those factors,whatever they may be,and you will find immediate correlations.
    Knowledge belongs to the world. (Synapse)

  7. #7
    Very interesting, guys! Thanks

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Sharmer
    I have experienced the opposite. I havenít squatted or deadlifted for 10 months, yet I still do a lot of upper body work. I found that my lower body strength levels did not drop off. I believe upper body strenght has some effect but speed work helps maintain lower body strength more then anything else.
    Really?

    So the speed work can replace the LB's weights work?

Similar Threads

  1. # of spikes
    By prophet in forum Forum Archives
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-25-2003, 05:54 PM
  2. David's Rugby Training Journal
    By David in forum My Training Journal
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 04-03-2003, 09:34 PM
  3. videos
    By Principles in forum Discussion Suggestions
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 03-14-2003, 05:42 PM
  4. Fitness Boxing Sprintin
    By lebeau in forum General Fitness
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 03-13-2003, 06:05 AM
  5. under/overload
    By jalbert in forum Biomechanics and Physiology
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 03-05-2003, 05:14 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •