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Thread: Repeat 300 yard shuttle test

  1. #1

    Repeat 300 yard shuttle test

    Is there any data out there that gives us what's an excellent to poor timing score in this test?

  2. #2
    Haven't done it with hockey players yet... Football skills guys 55 seconds, fat guys 60 seconds maybe 65. These are for DI athletes. I'm testing my Lacrosse Team Monday and our benchmark is 55... 2.30 rest and and other 55 sec. If you really want to break balls, do another one after a 2.30 rest. We'll find out real quick who did the winter workouts!

  3. #3
    just finished testing about 60 HS basketball and
    lacrosse players- we used a 2 min rest period. Kids in good shape were running 60-65s, the poorer shape kids were over 70s. Surprisingly they were very few kids in that 65-70 range- it was pretty cut and dried. Either you were in shape or out of shape. We'll continue to test, it was a small sample size, might be an anomaly- but I found it interesting. 55-60s would be very good for a high schooler. I really like this test.

  4. #4
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    Gentlemen, heed my words of caution in using this test on athletes whose sport discipline does not place demand upon the anaerobic-glycolytic system.

    The 300yd shuttle, in all its variations, invariably places the athlete in a lactic environment assuming that the effort given is high to maximal.

    American football, for example, is an alactic-aerobic endeavor and, despite the widespread popularity of the 300yd shuttle test, the use of this test is misplaced and the degree to which an athlete may score favorably on it has a very small correlation to the special work capacity necessary for maximizing sports results on the grid iron.

  5. #5
    Administrator Charlie Francis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by James Smith View Post
    Gentlemen, heed my words of caution in using this test on athletes whose sport discipline does not place demand upon the anaerobic-glycolytic system.

    The 300yd shuttle, in all its variations, invariably places the athlete in a lactic environment assuming that the effort given is high to maximal.

    American football, for example, is an alactic-aerobic endeavor and, despite the widespread popularity of the 300yd shuttle test, the use of this test is misplaced and the degree to which an athlete may score favorably on it has a very small correlation to the special work capacity necessary for maximizing sports results on the grid iron.
    Couldn't agree more- same goes for Soccer, although with a somewhat different split between alactic and aerobic.
    The trouble with tests is they get in the way of performance because often the athlete has to pass the test to get to play.
    One NHL guy I worked with needed a min 59 VO2max to get his full pay but he was a power guy. Total bullshit and a pain in the ass! Who comes up with this shit anyway?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Francis View Post
    Couldn't agree more- same goes for Soccer, although with a somewhat different split between alactic and aerobic.
    The trouble with tests is they get in the way of performance because often the athlete has to pass the test to get to play.
    One NHL guy I worked with needed a min 59 VO2max to get his full pay but he was a power guy. Total bullshit and a pain in the ass! Who comes up with this shit anyway?
    Indeed.

    Who 'came' up with it is more to the point as we both know that this is one of those dogmented traditions that has been around since the 'caveman' days of sport training in CONUS.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by boogatc View Post
    just finished testing about 60 HS basketball and
    lacrosse players- we used a 2 min rest period. Kids in good shape were running 60-65s, the poorer shape kids were over 70s. Surprisingly they were very few kids in that 65-70 range- it was pretty cut and dried. Either you were in shape or out of shape. We'll continue to test, it was a small sample size, might be an anomaly- but I found it interesting. 55-60s would be very good for a high schooler. I really like this test.
    Your "so called" out of shape athletes are probably your most powerful.

  8. #8
    I have seen some very powerful athletes perform quite well at this test in the collegiate setting. Because everyone was equally misconditioned using a good deal of lactic work leading up to the official test there were many power athletes who excelled.

  9. #9
    actually, our best, quickest, most athletic players tested best. Possibly because there is such a broad spectrum of abilities on the high school team. I understand everyone's points, coaches, though, want numbers to make objective evaluations, often regardless of whether the tests are predictors of success on the field. I would suggest that most field tests are not. The 40 yd dash comes quickly to mind.

  10. #10
    Our conditioning test to be able to get into camp was 6x150 yard shuttles (6x25 yards) in 27 seconds with 54 seconds rest. It sounds real easy on paper but the constant stopping and starting kills the legs. I wasn't the only one who's legs were trashed afterwards.

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