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Thread: Focus on hip dominant lifts?

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blinky
    I said single leg work is pointless. Big deal...

    "What's the point of combining strength and balance work? I could do power cleans on a skateboard at the top of a flight of stairs... does that make my agility better?"

    I was referring to the above statement.


    Sure you can gain strength from single limb movements. Agreed. You can do as many single arm bench presses as you want...

    The point I was trying to make was more of suggestion to your own training. Performing exclusively Squats and Bench Presses will not address any of the weaknesses that I stated earlier and may very well make things worse. By incorporating both elements (single and double limb lifts) a broader or more "General" positive result will occur. There are thousands of exercises that physcial therapists use to bring athletes back from injury once the source has been identified, that involve using one limb while exaggerating the imbalance so that the athlete can actually feel whats happening and make the correction. In sports such as Track and Field, 99% of the injuries will come from an imbalance somewhere.

  2. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by Vincente
    In sports such as Track and Field, 99% of the injuries will come from an imbalance somewhere.
    We have to be careful with such statements because it practically makes ‘imbalance’ mean everything. Lots of injuries are due to overstrains. Sure, that could be interpreted as an “imbalance” regarding work vs. rest… semantics!

  3. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by Vincente
    The point I was trying to make was more of suggestion to your own training. Performing exclusively Squats and Bench Presses will not address any of the weaknesses that I stated earlier and may very well make things worse. By incorporating both elements (single and double limb lifts) a broader or more "General" positive result will occur. There are thousands of exercises that physcial therapists use to bring athletes back from injury once the source has been identified, that involve using one limb while exaggerating the imbalance so that the athlete can actually feel whats happening and make the correction. In sports such as Track and Field, 99% of the injuries will come from an imbalance somewhere.
    Yeah, imbalances can and should be corrected. Single limb work isn't an optimal means to developing strength though. They are only accessory lifts.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blinky
    Yeah, imbalances can and should be corrected. Single limb work isn't an optimal means to developing strength though. They are only accessory lifts.

    Agreed, but strength means nothing if everything else is negatively affected. If your squat poundage has gone up but you've lost mobility in your hips. Who cares! You've gained nothing.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vincente
    Agreed, but strength means nothing if everything else is negatively affected. If your squat poundage has gone up but you've lost mobility in your hips. Who cares! You've gained nothing.
    Another example of the classic statement "You are only as Strong as your weakest link."
    Exactly what Duxx quoted from Alwyn Cosgrove..
    As Alwyn Cosgrove stated: If you have ferrary which is able to go 300km/h, but you have bad brakes, how much will you go? 100km/h max!!! Translated to athlete situation, his CNS knows that some muscles (small ones, stabilizers) are in disbalance, so CNS will decrease its output to prevent injuries... Improve "breaks" (homoeostasis control) and it will go faster!

  6. #36
    I think when you look at the success of various athletes who included both of the single leg and double leg training modalities it becomes obvious that both can work. There is no denying that squats will tax the CNS morso than single leg anything. What we must remember is that taxing the CNS isn't always our main goal.

    If you are having chronic soreness from the deads try rotating another exercise instead of the deads. Maybe keep your squat day the same, but every other week throw in lunges instead of deads.

    You must do your best to remain consistent with the exercises you are using, but excess soreness means over stressing one component of your training too much. You don't want that to eventually lead to an injury. Better off to listen to your body and switch it up with cleans on your deadlift day or lunges.

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