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Thread: Training The Master Sprinter 35+

  1. #101

    Re: Training The Master Sprinter 35+

    Quote Originally Posted by RB34 View Post
    I truly believe - once you begin to start training like a 50yr old athlete will be the day you start looking/performing like a 50yr old athlete. If you are 30-35 even 40 their shouldn't be major changes to your program esp if you been training non stop since your 20's.
    While I am not a fan of a bunch of work in the middle, I do agree with this statement. I've been hearing my peers say, "We're getting old," since around 28-years old. Everyone who has said that has gotten slower each season. If it were not for a pretty severe injury hampering my training, I would have done the exact same stuff the last few years. The main changes to training are to account for additional stresses in life--higher demands at work, fatherhood, etc. Other than backing off a bit due to those, all else should remain the same.

    The hardest thing for me in the last couple years has been remaining as consistent as I need to be. This has largely been due to the other demands taking precedence at times. The key is then not to bite off more than you can chew. If you know that other important things will come up, don't expect to do 10 things every week. Rather, plan to do 8. But then don't budge from those. Make sure you get them in. Create that consistency.

    In an effort to keep things simple and consistent, my weekly rules are as follows:
    Sprint 2x per week
    Deadlift 2x per week (usually on sprint days)
    Aerobic Conditioning 2x per week (usually 1 day extensive tempo and 1 day jump rope / medball)

    These are the rules. Period. The optimal week will have 4 training days and 3 rest days (2 high, 2 low). In cases where I can't hit the weights on a sprint day, I will get the deadlift in on a third HI day. This is a very manageable program, while still balanced across the main elements. Plyometrics (and other lifts) will be a part of speed days and could also make up a third HI day in the week if it feels appropriately. But I can't add a third HI day before I ensure 2 tempo days will be completed.

  2. #102
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
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    4,701

    Re: Training The Master Sprinter 35+

    Quote Originally Posted by Actuary400m View Post
    While I am not a fan of a bunch of work in the middle, I do agree with this statement. I've been hearing my peers say, "We're getting old," since around 28-years old. Everyone who has said that has gotten slower each season. If it were not for a pretty severe injury hampering my training, I would have done the exact same stuff the last few years. The main changes to training are to account for additional stresses in life--higher demands at work, fatherhood, etc. Other than backing off a bit due to those, all else should remain the same.

    The hardest thing for me in the last couple years has been remaining as consistent as I need to be. This has largely been due to the other demands taking precedence at times. The key is then not to bite off more than you can chew. If you know that other important things will come up, don't expect to do 10 things every week. Rather, plan to do 8. But then don't budge from those. Make sure you get them in. Create that consistency.

    In an effort to keep things simple and consistent, my weekly rules are as follows:
    Sprint 2x per week
    Deadlift 2x per week (usually on sprint days)
    Aerobic Conditioning 2x per week (usually 1 day extensive tempo and 1 day jump rope / medball)

    These are the rules. Period. The optimal week will have 4 training days and 3 rest days (2 high, 2 low). In cases where I can't hit the weights on a sprint day, I will get the deadlift in on a third HI day. This is a very manageable program, while still balanced across the main elements. Plyometrics (and other lifts) will be a part of speed days and could also make up a third HI day in the week if it feels appropriately. But I can't add a third HI day before I ensure 2 tempo days will be completed.
    Work in the middle can be misleading... You have the typical D3 middle work ex: 5x200 24-26s r 2-3mins, my middle work would be similar to Bill Collins where those same 200's would be 4-8mins of rest. This type of work allows you to get more reps practicing your skill and can be useful for athletes of our ability. Instead of always doing 2x150 resting 15-20mins ill do 6x150 resting 6-8mins still fast but getting more volume.

    Do your wife support what you do?

  3. #103

    Re: Training The Master Sprinter 35+

    Collins does have a speed session of 80m reducing down to 50, 30, 20 from week 20 to 50 each week.
    His `endurance work` looks like 800m runner reps rather than extensive tempo (ie harder) and will provide solid fitness.
    Although the volume looks scary he is actually only running 3x per week and alternates running and weights days. I hope he does some of the long reps on grass rather than track to protect the legs.
    But I can see how it could work for some people.

    I dont like the other one though:
    The `old white guys` are running 5 days per week most on the track I guess. Plus the rest of their training. That`s a lot of foot contact. Programme looks excessively complicated and I cant see an obvious pattern of LS or SL.

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