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Thread: Most effective type of squat

  1. #21
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    Re: Most effective type of squat

    Quote Originally Posted by robin1 View Post
    You are right in that I have squatted 2.5x body weight below parallel in the past. However, I have done next to no squats since late 2012 after I partially tore two adductor tendons while squatting. Since then, I've largely confined myself to deadlifting and haven't gone heavy with that either. Moreover, I've never done quarter squats. I thus have reason to believe that I have a lot of room for developing a much stronger quarter squat and will give this a try after the world masters champs.

    There's a video on YouTube of Ivana Spanovic quarter squatting 140kg with one leg (with the other foot resting on her knee). Not sure if I'd be able to do this right now.

    Another video shows Greg Rutherford doing low step ups with 250kg.

    Btw: I'd love to hear what you observed about his preparation for the London Olympics.
    Indeed if you have been doing nearly zero squatting then there is certainly strong plausibility that the reintegration of hip/knee extension strengthening will manifest in your jumping. Particularly so if you have been doing no other hip/knee extension tonic strength work (ergo step ups, lunges, split squats...)

    Similar to the Spanovic story, Dan told me that he saw Javier Sotomayor (world record holder in the high jump 2.45m) perform single leg barbell squats with 150kg (not sure the depth) the day before his world record jump.

    The heavy single leg work, more than anything, increases durability and stiffness for the ground impact force of penultimate and take-off efforts as the muscle contraction velocities are fantastically slower than the jump contacts.

    As for what I saw Greg doing, it was all on the track/field so all speed work (various sprints) and jump training (pop ups, short, medium, and long approach jumps...). I recall Dan telling me how he had Greg intentionally laterally displace his take-off contact farther out to the side in order to overcome some nagging issues Greg was having and Greg said it worked really well. Dan also told me that he believed Greg had the speed to compete in the open 100m.

    As we know, runway velocity has the greatest implications on the long jump.

  2. #22
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  3. #23
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    Re: Most effective type of squat

    On this fine forum there were number of discussions about the topic.
    One of the elements that stuck in my mind was what is stated in the paper posted by Pioneer "Morphology and anatomical variants" that says it all.
    Some guys cannot squat deep and some shouldn't be doing it in the first place.

    The two videos posted previously on this website are:

    "How Deep Should I Squat? How To Test Squat Depth" https://youtu.be/PkQb2LJtLgo

    "Dr. Stuart McGill - How big of a back arch should there be?"
    https://youtu.be/h3n8z1wy_SQ

    My opinion is that you can benefit from both whether is full of half, the problem is what's best and safe for you.

  4. #24
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    Re: Most effective type of squat

    I have done varies style squats through the years. Full olympic,partial 1/4 & parallel squats.

    I have found just about parallel squats the best. Similar to what Mike Rodgers does in this video https://www.instagram.com/p/_De8VcGy...erdat100&hl=en

  5. #25
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    Re: Most effective type of squat

    Quote Originally Posted by wermouth View Post
    On this fine forum there were number of discussions about the topic.
    One of the elements that stuck in my mind was what is stated in the paper posted by Pioneer "Morphology and anatomical variants" that says it all.
    Some guys cannot squat deep and some shouldn't be doing it in the first place.

    The two videos posted previously on this website are:

    "How Deep Should I Squat? How To Test Squat Depth" https://youtu.be/PkQb2LJtLgo

    "Dr. Stuart McGill - How big of a back arch should there be?"
    https://youtu.be/h3n8z1wy_SQ

    My opinion is that you can benefit from both whether is full of half, the problem is what's best and safe for you.
    I agree. What is best for the individual.
    Just don't forget that the load on the joints from certain lifts is so high and not forgetting everything you do as an athlete or coach must get added up and added into the equation. You need to save joint wear and tear for the force you create when OR more importantly IF you run fast. If you suck up all that buffer doing stupid lifts to show off in the weight room might be good for one season but proper planning has 4 years interval sections and that too needs to be added up and into that amount of time.
    Debating is good regarding the lifting.

    I will never forget Charlie telling me he could 'make' me faster in a shorter period of time but to be faster longer term it takes a different approach

    Charlie provided a huge cross section of work to draw from.
    You Tube screws big picture thinking if you are not careful.

    Sprinters need never forget the game is to preserve themselves for the highest priority of running as fast as possible as often as they are able while getting as strong as possible in the more careful way.

    Simple.

  6. #26

    Re: Most effective type of squat

    I've been doing bilateral and single-leg quarter squats for a few weeks now. I've noticed that despite the added difficulty of having to balance on one foot during the single-leg squats, the weight I can move is relatively higher. If I use 180kg for 6 reps in the bilateral squat, for example, using 120kg on the single-leg squat is similarly challenging. Adding my body weight (71kg) to the weight on the bar I'm thus moving about 75% of the weight in a single-leg compared to a conventional squat.

    Has anyone had similar experiences? I would have thought that it should be more like 50% or even less due to the added balancing component.

    This suggests to me that the single-leg squat is the superior exercises and I should maybe just focus on it. It allows me to move much more weight per leg, puts less stress on my back/shoulders, trains proprioception/balance and is more similar to the movement patterns of running and jumping. There is also some research showing a strong positive effect of unilateral work on RFD.

    Any thoughts?

  7. #27

    Re: Most effective type of squat

    You can't establish a causal relationship with the study designed used. Randomised controlled trials provided better data. Whilst groups are randomly assigned, there is no control group. The overwhelming data from the literature indicates that greatest power gains are achieved through a combination method incorporating high velocity and high force movements. Working exclusively on one component won't elicit optimum outcomes

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