Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 34

Thread: Most effective type of squat

  1. #1

    Most effective type of squat

    Interesting research suggesting that quarter squats are more effective than half or full squats in improving sprint performance:

    https://www.degruyter.com/downloadpd...-2016-0006.xml

  2. #2

    Re: Most effective type of squat

    That is interesting, but I'd be quite interested to see the effects on athletes with stronger/higher/faster initial scores. However, one of the difficulties of finding such a study is that as athletes' athletic measures increase, their inclination to participate in a training experiment decreases.

  3. #3

    Re: Most effective type of squat

    The vast majority (24/28) of the participants were football players, which suggests that they were accustomed to speed training and the 40 yard dash The quarter squat group was already the fastest group to begin with. They went from 4.68 to about 4.58 on average, which is quite decent. Their vertical jump increased from 75 to about 86cm. the full squat group didn't improve their sprint performance at all. Seems highly unlikely that in higher trained athletes this trend would be significantly different, although the magnitude of improvement would probably be reduced. A lot of world class track and field athletes use the quarter squat, which is now supported by scientific research.

    This makes a lot of sense because joint angles in sprinting and jumping exercises are a lot more smilar to the quarter squat. Using the quarter squat allows you to use heavier loads in the relevant joint angle ranges. When using a full squat, the load is not challenging anymore once you get into these joint angle ranges. The study shows that strength increases are quite specific to the type of squat used, so the full squat does not really improve strength in the joint angle range used for sprinting and jumping.

  4. #4
    Administrator Angela Coon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    1,492

    Re: Most effective type of squat

    I was always taught the full squat was not needed for the purposes of sprinting.

    And how about people like Merlene Ottey who apparently did not squat.

    The Olympic lifting movement has become so big due to x fit and then there is so much information floating about that people become confused about what is right and what is wrong for sprinting.

    It's interesting to see studies validate what was successfully performed by many athletes on Charlie's watch well over 30 plus years ago.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    1,617

    Re: Most effective type of squat

    I posted this clip of Stuart McGill a few months ago in another thread related to squatting, but it's worth repeating.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IxAVJkbTf0M

    Of most relevance is his observation that the type of hip anatomy that allows for high sprint performance is incompatible with deep squatting. Which is probably why you don't see many video clips of world class sprinters performing deep olympic style squats.

    Also keep in mind that real olympic lifters (not wannabes) don't squat deep for its own sake or because they believe it's a superior way of building leg strength. They do so out of necessity so that they don't have to pull the bar as high in order to catch it.

  6. #6

    Re: Most effective type of squat

    Quote Originally Posted by Angela Coon View Post
    I was always taught the full squat was not needed for the purposes of sprinting.

    And how about people like Merlene Ottey who apparently did not squat.
    You can add to the no-squat club MVP athletes including Asafa Powell, Fraser-Pryce, and, I believe though I have not seen videos, Elaine Thompson. Steve Francis does not believe in squats and MVP does not do them as part of regular training. Asafa does squats now with his brother, but not when he held the world record. What MVP does instead is weighted step-ups.

  7. #7

    Re: Most effective type of squat

    Interesting article on T Nation from Charlie, great reading and Charlie states that his athletes squat past parallel for hamstring activation.
    Last edited by Angela Coon; 10-26-2016 at 02:33 PM.

  8. #8

    Re: Most effective type of squat

    The article cited by Robin raises a few question marks. The quarter squat group had pre-test the highest deep squat score and the lowest bodyweight. The ratio was 1.50, compared to 1.31 for the half squat group and 1.37 for the deep squat group. Not exactly three equally matched training groups. The quarter squat 1RM values were only 35% or so higher that the deep squat 1RM. In my experience athletes can lift a lot more from a quarter squat position. No lifting velocities were given. Perhaps the quarter squat group lifted with more power (force x velocity) working on the right side of the F-v spectrum where they needed to improve, whereas their slow strength capabilities were already good enough. Also note that they only did weight training, no sprints or other sports.

  9. #9
    Administrator Angela Coon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    1,492

    Re: Most effective type of squat

    Interesting article from Charlie, great reading and Charlie states that his athletes squat past parallel for hamstring activation.[/QUOTE]


    It's not interesting because it was not an interview and what has happened is someone took some facts from Speed Trap and other books and posted the comments as it pertained to questions they made up. The article mentions a book that Charlie wrote but it was not published until after 2010.

  10. #10

    Re: Most effective type of squat

    The fact that the quarter squat group already had the best sprint times and squat to weight ratio suggests that they should have been expected to improve the least. The opposite is what happened. A more evenly matched group should thus have shown an even greater effect of the quarter squat. They didn't have the best vertical jump though.

    They explain their definition of full, half and quarter squats including the expected knee joint angles in the paper. What they define as a quarter squat may be a bit deeper than what others may consider a quarter squat. Also, by the time they had been training the quarter squat for 16 weeks, the difference between their quarter squat and their full squat was a lot greater.

    Regarding hamstring activation, the article also cites a study which showed that partial squats give more hamstring activation than deep squats. In a low squat position, the hamstrings are too short to be able to contribute much.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •