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Thread: Achilles tendinopathy

  1. #21

    Re: Achilles tendinopathy

    Hi ESTI, my plantar fasciitis was diagnosed by X-Ray and ultrasound. There is a heel spur and swelling of the plantar fascia. My Achilles tendon has a tender nodule in it, so in both cases structural issues are definitely present. The plantar fascia is basically a continuation of the achilles tendon, and pathologies of the two structures commonly co-exist.

  2. #22
    Member Chris6878's Avatar
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    Re: Achilles tendinopathy

    Quote Originally Posted by Angela Coon View Post
    Chris,

    You are welcome.

    Check this out as well

    .http://www.charliefrancis.com/blogs/...print-injuries
    Thanks, great info

  3. #23
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    Re: Achilles tendinopathy

    In both conditions, they can be grouped as heel dysfunction. I asked if Robin had both on the same foot, because as he said, they go together. We all have dysfunctions, yet we all don't have pain from them, yet. With time it's possible it will occur. Given a dysnfunction(s), you get poor movement, for example, and in Robin's case, likely a heavy heel striking. At some point, he began to get pain in the heel (Robin, was it achilles or PF first?) it got to the point where structure was changed, as his comment on the imaging. But the question is what is causing the pain? Pain theory is complex and even I have a novice understanding of it. However, in my experience with a Neurofunctional Acupuncture approach, treating the dysfunction in the person's given state, and treating nerve trunks, roots and branches can improve pain levels.

    If you have seen Jane Project and Fundamental videos, you will have seen Dr. Mike Prebeg.

    A great example of this Neurofunctional approach is NHL goalie Ray Emery. Dr's found he had Avascular necrosis, the same injury that ended Bo Jackson's career. Ray had 13cm taking from his lower leg to fix his hip. Ray saw Dr. Prebeg. I saw Dr. Prebeg's lecture on Ray's case study. Using this same approach, extended Ray's career when everyone said he would never play again. The video is taken offline, and if it's uploaded again, I will post it. I was fortunate enough to have taken a course that Dr. Prebeg was an instructor at, and also Dr. Elorriaga, who's articles I posted below for more information. Dr. Elorriaga has worked with some of the best in various pro sports for many years.

    Having studied with both of these practitioners, I have seen about a dozen or so case studies in person of single treatments, sometimes single needle insertions, eliminating pain and improving function, in cases where traditional therapy did not work.

    Here is more info on Neurofunctional Acupunture:
    http://mcmasteracupuncture.com/conte...e-an-overview/

    http://www.physiotherapy.ca/getmedia.../teleseminar-h
    Last edited by ESTI; 12-15-2015 at 10:57 PM.

  4. #24

    Re: Achilles tendinopathy

    Hi ESTI, it was AT first, which I have been getting on and off since 2008. I got PF for the first time this year. Both are on the left side. Sometimes the right AT also starts acting up a bit after a while, but it always starts with and is worse on the left side. My left leg is 1.5cm shorter and the left ankle has a slightly limited ROM due to an ankle sprain I sustained as a teenager. I also noticed that my left dorsiflexors were a bit weak when I started to exercise them as part of my PF rehab program.

    Btw: Has anyone observed a connection between dehydration and tendon issues? I think I got a bit dehydrated during a 30h journey from Australia to the US recently, and the AT got worse afterwards. It was the first time I couldn't warm up to a point where I wouldn't feel it anymore. I can't find any proper studies on such a connection, but some websites talk about it.

  5. #25
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    Re: Achilles tendinopathy

    I just had a runner pressure mapped. She is/was a heavy heel striker and had a lot of lower leg issues (which is why I had her evaluated). Turned out her heel striking side was shorter as well. With a shorter leg, the stride cycle is thrown off and one side lands heavy (shorter side is a theme I am noticing with athletes). You mentioned the dorsiflexion and ankle injury, both of which are probable causes for your movement dysfunction. I would add you are likely tighter in the gastroc and soleus and may have some peroneal muscle weakness as well.

    Interesting idea on hydration. Very possible. There has been more published on fascia and hydration recently. Also possible the bent knee position in flight causing tightness of lower leg (soleus/gastroc?)?

  6. #26
    Administrator Angela Coon's Avatar
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    Re: Achilles tendinopathy

    Every habit you have translates into your health.

    Every action you take large or small will translate into some form of performance as a person or as an athlete.

    There is no downside to practicing permanent habits that have the largest return in terms of prevention.

    If you are a coach or an athlete there are baseline habits to be taught, learned and practiced routinely.

    In a perfect world a knowledgeable therapist will be part of a team or group or club but in a sport like track this won't happen in any meaningful way until some notable success has been accomplished. So what happens in the meantime?

  7. #27
    Administrator Angela Coon's Avatar
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    Re: Achilles tendinopathy

    Project Jane illustrates an ideal situation that could be replicated without all the specifics.

    I want people reading this to understand how many of the ideas taught here and from many of the products do not have to be performed in absolute terms 100 percent of the time.

    The combination of creative thinking with scientific method will go a long way.

    All the greatest training in the world will only last so long without regeneration.

    All the regeneration in the world won't make you fast if the training has not been methodically planned according to rules and progressions we have been outlining here since the site began.

  8. #28

    Re: Achilles tendinopathy

    Quote Originally Posted by robin1 View Post
    Can you elaborate on the basis for your opinion regarding skipping? I haven't seen any studies comparing eccentrics to skipping, but 3s isometrics were a lot more effective than skipping/plyometrics in building achilles strength in the cyclic strain study I cited above. The research seems to suggest that plyometric type contractions are too short to stretch tenocytes sufficiently to stimulate a lot of collagen synthesis and that high intensity loading for about 3s at a time is ideal. I personally haven't seen much benefit from skipping. I have usually continued my sprint training to some degree while rehabbing achilles flare ups, so I guess that's giving me enough plyometric type foot contacts (around 200 per foot per session including warm-up) to not derive further benefit from skipping.

    I have applied the work of Professor Jill Cook to my own rehab protocol, she is a world-leading expert on tendon injuries. She has quite an extensive number of studies, but in brief imaging or scans are not a significant factor with rehabilitation. The key is progressively increasing capacity to the demands of the sport. In sprinting the AT undergoes rapid stretch and contraction, therefore, rehab will need to progressively incorporate a range of exercises which sufficiently restore function to the demands of the sport. An interesting note, longitudinal studies show that sprinters are 15x more likely to develop degeneration in the AT compared to wrestlers

    http://www.latrobe.edu.au/she/staff/...e?uname=jlcook

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